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Historical Maps

Normal School (1905-1919)State Teachers College (1919-1949)State College (1949-1972)State University (1972-2005)

Recent aerial photos of Northwest Missouri State University were combined with aerial drawings of campus from its earlier years for the Centennial Celebration in 2005. Four ariels show the growth and change over the 100 year history.

Normal School (1905-1919)

Administrative Building

This building was constructed to be the home of the Northwest Normal's administration, offices, and classrooms. The cornerstone was laid October 12, 1907, and the first classes were held here three years later, October 3, 1910. When completed, the building consisted of four floors a gymnasium, and an auditorium.

Power House

The powerhouse and heating plant were constructed for the purpose of supplying the school with poser and heat through steam. The plant was put into use in 1910 when Academic Hall opened its doors to students. Many subsequent improvements were made to the plant in following years.

Gaunt House

The Gaunt House and its property of 21 acres were purchased as the site for the Northwest Normal and Academic Hall. This had been the residence of Thomas Gaunt or Captain Gaunt, who came to Maryville in 1857 and set up a nursery. During the 1870's Gaunt built his family the brick house that would be and is currently the residence of Northwest's President.

Seminary

The Maryville Seminary came into being October 1, 1887 in response to the state legislature's denial of a state normal school in Maryville that same year. The Seminary building was constructed on July 22,1890, and was in operation until 1903, when it was offered to Maryville to be used as an incentive to acquire the Northwest Normal. The building was used for classes until they moved to Academic Hall in 1910. The following year, the boy's dormitory and was used as one until the building was razed in 1923.

Farm Buildings

Roy Kinnaird, part of the agriculture department faculty, is credited for much of the advancement of the farm in the early years. More land was acquired, and by 1920, farm buildings and a farm residence had been constructed.




State Teachers College (1919-1949)

Administrative Building

This building was constructed to be the home of the Northwest Normal's administration, offices, and classrooms. The cornerstone was laid October12, 1907, and the first classes were held here three years later, October 3, 1910. When completed, the building consisted of four floors a gymnasium, and an auditorium.

PowerHouse

The powerhouse and heating plant were constructed for the purpose of supplying the school with poser and heat through steam. The plant was put into use in 1910 when Academic Hall opened its doors to students. Many subsequent improvements were made to the plant in following years.

Library / Wells Hall

Northwest's first library was located in the Administration Building. With the increased needs for more classroom and library space soon became very apparent. This prompted the construction of a separate library, which was dedicated on October 7, 1939.

Residence Hall (Roberta Hall)

Not long after the Northwest Normal opened its door to students, the question came of what to do about student housing. As dean of women, Alice Perrin had tried to see to the boarding of students. In 1913, it was decided that some plan for women's housing should be initiated. Construction of a women's dormitory finally began in 1922 and was ready to be used by January 1923. The building continued to be a women's dormitory except from 1942 to 1943 when the women moved out and the men from the Navy V-12 program moved in.

Gaunt House

The Gaunt House and its property of 21 acres were purchased as the site for the Northwest Normal and Academic Hall. This had been the residence of Thomas Gaunt or Captain Gaunt, who came to Maryville in 1857 and set up a nursery. During the 1870's Gaunt built his family the brick house that would be and is currently the residence of Northwest's President.

College Pond / (Colden Pond)

President Lamkin wanted the campus to have a pond and so one was dug in the late 1930's. However, the chosen location of the pond was also where Captain Gaunt had long ago put in drainage tiles for his nursery. The result was that the pond would not hold water and was mockingly referred to as Lamkin's Lake. The problem was discovered, the tiles were removed and the pond did eventually hold water and become a positive addition to the campus.

Gymnasium (Martindale Gym)

The first gymnasium classes were held in tow rooms on the first floor of the Administration Building. The need for a larger gymnasium and more classroom space in the Administration Building determined that a gymnasium would have to be built. In the fall of 1925, the building was completed, with the first game of basketball played there in January 9, 1926.

Bearcat Stadium

The first athletic field had been located next to the Administration building. With the growth of the school, athletics, and enthusiasm for sports, a new stadium was built near the gymnasium. After World War II, the stadium was improved and expanded, and in 1949, it was named Memorial Stadium in honor of the faculty and students who had served in the World Wars.

Horace Mann

Horace Mann became the location of the laboratory school and the department of education. Previously, the laboratory school had been in the administration building, and as was the case with the library, the space was badly needed for college classes. This building was dedicated the same day as Well's Hall, October 7. 1939. It was given the name Horace Mann Laboratory School two years earlier by the Board of Regents.

Quads

Not much had been done with the situation, or lack thereof, of men's housing since the razing of the seminary in 1923. This was the case until 1938, when a construction project for men's dormitories was finally made possible by the National Youth Administration. This was a project funded by the federal government that would consist of a group of young men who would construct the buildings while receiving training in industrial and manual arts. One-hundred and ten young men constructed five buildings, four of them dormitories and the other a dining/multipurpose building. The shape formed by the position of the buildings caused them to be designated the Quads.

Thompson - Ringold

The Industrial Arts Building was built during the presidency of Uel Lamkin in 1931. Brick from the razing of the Seminary in 1925 was used for its construction. Several later additions were made during Lamkin's presidency.

Vets Village

Vets Village was a collection of army housing units that were relocated from army camps to the university to be changed to 44 apartments for married students, particularly veterans and their families. Vets Village was used as married housing until it was torn down to make room for the new science building.

Farm Buildings

Roy Kinnaird, part of the agriculture department faculty, is credited for much of the advancement of the farm in the early years. More land was acquired, and by 1920, farm buildings and a farm residence had been constructed.

State College (1949-1972)

Phillips Hall

Phillips Hall and Franken Hall were the first two high-rise dormitories built on campus to make room for the growing student body. Like Franken, Phillips is a seven story building and was ready for students to move into by the fall of 1966. Homer T. Phillips is the building's namesake. Mr. Phillips was very influential in the education department, as he began the Horace Mann Laboratory School and was the head of the educational department for numerous years.

Millikan Hall

Millikan Hall was part of the construction of high-rise dormitories that were built in the response to the need for an increase in student housing. Two more high rises were to join the already built Phillips and Franken Halls. The two new high rises would be women's dormitories and were to be finished by 1970. However, they were not finished at the planned time and the female students had to make use of the mobile homes for married housing in College Park. By the fall of 1971, the halls were finally finished. Millikan Hall was named for Chloe Millikan. She had been extremely influential in the education department. Millikan was a teacher of early childhood education courses, established the kindergarten in 1929, and was head of the elementary school from 1955 to 1961.

Franken Hall

A great increase in student numbers created the need for more housing. As a result two high-rise dormitories with seven stories were built and ready for occupation by the fall of 1966. One of these high rises was name Franken Hall after Katherine Franken. She was part of the faculty of the education department from 1921 until 1953. Katherine, along with her sister and fellow faculty member Margaret Franken, helped organize and sponsor the Newman Club.

Dieterich Hall

Dieterich Hall was one of the four high-rise dormitories that were constructed. This hall, along with Millikan Hall, was one of the two later high rises to be built and like the other high rises is a seven-story building. Male students first took up residence here in the fall of 1971. Dieterich is named in honor of Herbert R. Dieterich, who was a member of the Northwest faculty from 1928 to 1969. During his time at Northwest, he served as principal of Horace Mann High School, instructor of education, and was chair of the secondary education department.

R.T. Wright Farm

Under the direction of R.T. Wright, who began his career in the agricultural department in 1935, land continued to be added to the farm, and by 1955, it consisted of a productive 180 acres, several buildings and different crops and livestock. In 1965, the farm was named R.T Wright Farm for the man who had contributed so much to its development. The farm continued to grow and expand. Faustiana Farms was leased in 1970 by Northwest so that there would be access to its stables, land, and barns to keep horses owned and leased by the university. Hogs were successful under the Swine Testing Station as was the diary under the direction of Dr. Dennis Padgitt.

Horace Mann (Brown Hall)

Horace Mann became the location of the laboratory school and the department of education. Previously the laboratory school had been in the administrative building, and as was the case with the library, the space was badly needed for college classes. This building was dedicated the same day as Well's Hall, October 7, 1939. It was given the name Horace Mann Laboratory School two years earlier by the Board of Regents.

Administration building

This building was constructed to be the home of the Northwest Normal's administration, offices, and classrooms. The cornerstone was laid October 12, 1907. The first classes were held there three years later, October 3, 1910. When completed, the building consisted of four floors, a gymnasium, and an auditorium. Subsequent years have seen the building of new gyms, classroom buildings, and auditoriums so many of Academic Hall's original utilizations have found a home elsewhere.

Powerhouse

The powerhouse and heating plant were constructed for the purpose of supplying the school with power and heat through steam. The plant was put into use in 1910 when Academic Hall opened its doors to students. Many subsequent improvements were made to the plant in following years.

Well's Hall

Northwest's first library was located in the Administration Building. Soon the need for more classroom and library space became very apparent. This prompted the construction of a separate library, which was dedicated on October 7, 1939. It was not until the summer of 1961 that the building was named in the honor of C.E. Wells who had been a librarian at Northwest for 38 years, beginning in 1911.

Roberta Hall

This dormitory was known as Residence Hall until 1961, when the name was changed to Roberta Hall in the honor of Roberta Steel. On April 28, 1951, a gas tank located near the dormitory exploded, injuring residents of the dorm and causing severe damage to the structure. Roberta Steel was among those injured. She had seemed to recover and returned to school the following year; however, her injuries proved to be too great and she died as a result.

Perrin Hall

Perrin Hall, finished in the fall of 1962 to be used as a freshmen women's dormitory, is named after the Alice Perrin who was Northwest's first dean of women. Alice Perrin started her career at Northwest in 1911. During her time as dean, Ms. Perrin even opened her own house, which became known as Perrin Hall, for the boarding of students. She was very well known and active with the students on campus. Perrin was dean of women until 1923 and then served as assistant dean until her death in 1927.

Hudson Hall

Hudson Hall, along with Perrin Hall, opened in the fall of 1962 as a women's dormitory. The dorm was named in honor of Nell Hudson who was the first woman registrar. She became the first female registrar July 1, 1927 and was also the first charter member of Sigma Sigma Sigma.

Colden Hall

This building was initially meant to house science and the fine arts; however, when constructed, it did not prove amendable to those departments. Instead, on May 1, 1959, the departments of history, social science education, psychology, language and literature, and business moved in. It was known as Classroom Building for two years until it was finally given the name Colden Hall after Charles J. Colden who was the first president of the Board of Regents and was instrumental in ensuring that Maryville was the site of the Northwest Normal.

College Pond/(Colden pond)

President Lamkin wanted the campus to have a pond and so one was dug in the late 1930's. However, the chosen location of the pond was also where Captain Gaunt had long ago put in drainage tiles for his nursery. The result was that the pond would not hold water and was mockingly referred to as Lamkin's Lake. The problem was discovered, the tiles were removed and the pond did eventually hold water and become a positive addition to the campus

Olive DeLuce Fine Arts Building

This building was completed in the fall of 1965 for the purpose of housing art, music, and some theater, with the building's 550 seat theater. The building's namesake, Olive DeLuce, had been chair of the fine arts department for forty years, 1915 to 1955. Ms. DeLuce was a very prominent and influential member of Northwest and its development. The theater within the Fine Arts building was named in honor of Charles Johnson, who had been a faculty member since 1953 and was the art department's acting chair at the time of his death in 1963 at the age of 37.

Rickenbrode Stadium (Bearcat Stadium)

With the growth of the school, athletics, and enthusiasm for sports, a new stadium was built near the gymnasium. After World War II, the stadium was improved and expanded, and in 1949, it was named Memorial Stadium in honor of the faculty and students who had served in the World Wars. The stadium was renamed Rickenbrode Stadium in 1961. This was in honor of William Rickenbrode, who began his long career at Northwest in 1907 as registrar and secretary to the president and also served as secretary to the Board of Regents and bursar during his time at Northwest. Rickenbrode was an ardent Bearcat fan and was affectionately known as "Mr. Bearcat."

Martindale Gym

The gymnasium was renovated in 1959 to become the women's gym because a new gymnasium was being constructed at this time to house the men. Two years after its renovation, it became Martindale Gymnasium after Nell Martindale Kuchs. She had come to Northwest in 1928 as the director of physical education for women and served in the position of chair and teacher for 7 years.

Colbert Hall/South Complex (Wilson, Cook, and Richardson)

This complex of halls was to serve as more housing for men. It was shaped in the form of a U and was placed near the other men's housing, the Quads. The complex consisted of a set of three halls or wings that were connected. These three halls were named Wilson Hall, Cook Hall, and Richardson Hall. Lon Wilson was Dean of Men and died five weeks after the naming of the dorm. Cook Hall was named for T.H Cook, a professor of history who had a long career at Northwest. Ira Richardson was the fourth president of Northwest, serving from 1913 to 1921. The complex was named Colbert Hall after George Colbert, who was the first dean of faculty and a professor of mathematics.

Douglas-Cooper Hall/North Complex

Douglas-Cooper Hall was part of the plan to increase men's housing. This was to surround and enclose the men's dormitories at that time, the Quad, and would extend out in an L-shape east and north of Colbert Hall. The building was ready to be used in fall 1963. It is named after R. L. Douglas who was a lawyer from St. Joseph and was a member of the Board of Regents for 24 years. The east part of the building was known as Cooper Hall. The original Cooper Hall had been one of the Quads and was torn down to make room for the new dormitory. Both were named in honor of Albert Cooper who was one of the early students of the Northwest Normal and later became a member of its staff, serving as field director. This Hall currently serves as the home to the Missouri Academy of Arts and Sciences.

JW Jones Student Union

Construction of the student union began in the fall 1950, and the building was completed and ready to be used by October of 1952. The building of the union was initiated by President J.W. Jones, who was president of Northwest from 1945 until 1964. During this time, many improvements were seen on campus. Included in these improvements are Lamkin Gymnasium, Colden Hall, additions and renovations to the Industrial Arts Building and Martindale Gymnasium, the union, and Perrin, Hudson, Colbert, Douglas, and Cooper Halls. Jones was also the first president to have a doctorate and to have previously been employed as a dean at Northwest before becoming president. In 1955, the building was named after the man who had dedicated so much time and energy to see its construction.

Bell Tower

Idea of a bell tower on campus came from President Foster, who wished for it to enhance the campus and serve as a memorial for alumni and faculty who had passed away and for those who died in war. The construction of the bell tower was made possible through the generous donation of alumni. It took five years from its first inception until ground was finally broken for the project. The bell tower was finished in 1971.

Home Management House (Mabel Cook)

This building was finished in 1962 and was constructed at the request of President Jones. The Home Management House was designed by Donald Valk, who was head of the industrial arts department. The purpose of this building was to house home economics majors who would receive experience in home management while living there and being supervised by a faculty member.

Garrett-Strong

May 31, 1968, Garrett-Strong was dedicated as the new residence for the mathematics and science departments. Construction of the over 100,000 square foot structure cost $3,000,000. The building was located on the site of where the Vet's Village, the married housing, had been previously. It was decided that the building would be named for two men who had made long and great contributions to these departments at Northwest, Mr. William T. Garrett and Dr. J Gordon Strong. Dr. Strong had served in the science and math department of Northwest for 21 years, 1943 to 1964. During this time, he served as chairman for the department of physical science and also the department of science and mathematics. Mr. Garrett had also been a long-time member of the university's faculty, with thirty-eight years of service from 1927 to 1965. He had become chair of the biology department after five years of becoming a member of its faculty and helped see this department grow and advance.

Industrial Arts

The Industrial Arts Building was built during the presidency of Uel Lamkin in 1931. Brick from the razing of the Seminary in 1925 was used for its construction. Several additions were made during Lamkin's presidency and continued with three more additions to the building during the time of President J.W. Jones.

State University (1972-2005)

Phillips Hall

Phillips Hall and Franken Hall were the first two high-rise dormitories built on campus to make room for the growing student body. Like Franken, Phillips is a seven story building and was ready for students to move into by the fall of 1966. Homer T. Phillips is the building's namesake. Mr. Phillips was very influential in the education department, as he began the Horace Mann Laboratory School and was the head of the educational department for numerous years.

Millikan Hall

Millikan Hall was part of the construction of high-rise dormitories that were built in the response to the need for an increase in student housing. Two more high rises were to join the already built Phillips and Franken Halls. The two new high rises would be women's dormitories and were to be finished by 1970. However, they were not finished at the planned time and the female students had to make use of the mobile homes for married housing in College Park. By the fall of 1971, the halls were finally finished. Millikan Hall was named for Chole Millikan. She was a teacher of early childhood education courses, established the kindergarten in 1929, and was head of the elementary school from 1955 to 1961.

Franken Hall

A great increase in student numbers created the need for more housing. As a result two high-rise dormitories with seven stories were built and ready for occupation by the fall of 1966. One of these high rises was name Franken Hall after Katherine Franken. She was part of the faculty of the education department from 1921 until 1953. Katherine, along with her sister and fellow faculty member Margaret Franken, helped organize and sponsor the Newman Club.

Dieterich Hall

Dieterich Hall was one of the four high-rise dormitories that were constructed. This hall, along with Millikan Hall, was one of the two later high rises to be built and like the other high rises is a seven-story building. Male students first took up residence here in the fall of 1971. Dieterich is named in honor of Herbert R. Dieterich, who was a member of the Northwest faculty from 1928 to 1969. During his time at Northwest, he served as principal of Horace Mann High School, instructor of education, and was chair of the secondary education department.

Brown Hall

Horace Mann became the location of the laboratory school and the department of education. Previously the laboratory school had been in the administrative building, and as was the case with the library, the space was badly needed for college classes. This building was dedicated the same day as Well's Hall, October 7, 1939. It was given the name Horace Mann Laboratory School two years earlier by the Board of Regents.

Administration Building

This building was constructed to be the home of the Northwest Normal's administration, offices, and classrooms. The cornerstone was laid October 12, 1907. The first classes were held there three years later, October 3, 1910. When completed, the building consisted of four floors, a gymnasium, and an auditorium. Subsequent years have seen the building of new gyms, classroom buildings, and auditoriums so many of Academic Hall's original utilizations have found a home elsewhere.

Power House

The powerhouse and heating plant were constructed for the purpose of supplying the school with power and heat through steam. The plant was put into use in 1910 when Academic Hall opened its doors to students. Many subsequent improvements were made to the plant in following years.

Wells Hall

Northwest's first library was located in the Administration Building. Soon the need for more classroom and library space became very apparent. This prompted the construction of a separate library, which was dedicated on October 7, 1939. It was not until the summer of 1961 that the building was named in the honor of C.E. Wells who had been a librarian at Northwest for 38 years, beginning in 1911.

Roberta Hall

This dormitory was known as Residence Hall until 1961, when the name was changed to Roberta Hall in the honor of Roberta Steel. On April 28, 1951, a gas tank located near the dormitory exploded, injuring residents of the dorm and causing severe damage to the structure. Roberta Steel was among those injured. She had seemed to recover and returned to school the following year; however, her injuries proved to be too great and she died as a result.

Perrin Hall

Perrin Hall, finished in the fall of 1962 to be used as a freshmen women's dormitory, is named after the Alice Perrin who was Northwest's first dean of women. Alice Perrin started her career at Northwest in 1911. During her time as dean, Ms. Perrin even opened her own house, which became known as Perrin Hall, for the boarding of students. She was very well known and active with the students on campus. Perrin was dean of women until 1923 and then served as assistant dean until her death in 1927.

Hudson Hall

Hudson Hall, along with Perrin Hall, opened in the fall of 1962 as a women's dormitory. The dorm was named in honor of Nell Hudson who was the first woman registrar. She became the first female registrar July 1, 1927 and was also the first charter member of Sigma Sigma Sigma.

Colden Hall

This building was initially meant to house science and the fine arts; however, when constructed, it did not prove amendable to those departments. Instead, on May 1, 1959, the departments of history, social science education, psychology, language and literature, and business moved in. It was known as Classroom Building for two years until it was finally given the name Colden Hall after Charles J. Colden who was the first president of the Board of Regents and was instrumental in ensuring that Maryville was the site of the Northwest Normal.

Colden pond

President Lamkin wanted the campus to have a pond and so one was dug in the late 1930's. However, the chosen location of the pond was also where Captain Gaunt had long ago put in drainage tiles for his nursery. The result was that the pond would not hold water and was mockingly referred to as Lamkin's Lake. The problem was discovered, the tiles were removed and the pond did eventually hold water and become a positive addition to the campus.

Fine Arts Building

This building was completed in the fall of 1965 for the purpose of housing art, music, and some theater, with the building's 550 seat theater. The building's namesake, Olive DeLuce, had been chair of the fine arts department for forty years, 1915 to 1955. Ms. DeLuce was a very prominent and influential member of Northwest and its development. The theater within the Fine Arts building was named in honor of Charles Johnson, who had been a faculty member since 1953 and was the art department's acting chair at the time of his death in 1963 at the age of 37.

Stadium

In 2004, Rickenbrode Stadium became known as Bearcat stadium after having extensive work and additions made to enhance the stadium that has housed two national championship teams. The name Bearcat Stadium is meant to honor all Bearcats.

South Complex

This complex of halls was to serve as more housing for men. It was shaped in the form of a U and was placed near the other men's housing, the Quads. The complex consisted of a set of three halls or wings that were connected. These three halls were named Wilson Hall, Cook Hall, and Richardson Hall. Lon Wilson was Dean of Men and died five weeks after the naming of the dorm. Cook Hall was named for T.H Cook, a professor of history who had a long career at Northwest. Ira Richardson was the fourth president of Northwest, serving from 1913 to 1921. The complex was named Colbert Hall after George Colbert, who was the first dean of faculty and a professor of mathematics.

North Complex

Douglas-Cooper Hall was part of the plan to increase men's housing. This was to surround and enclose the men's dormitories at that time, the Quad, and would extend out in an L-shape east and north of Colbert Hall. The building was ready to be used in fall 1963. It is named after R. L. Douglas who was a lawyer from St. Joseph and was a member of the Board of Regents for 24 years. The east part of the building was known as Cooper Hall. The original Cooper Hall had been one of the Quads and was torn down to make room for the new dormitory. Both were named in honor of Albert Cooper who was one of the early students of the Northwest Normal and later became a member of its staff, serving as field director. This Hall currently serves as the home to the Missouri Academy of Arts and Sciences.

J.W. Jones Union

Construction of the student union began in the fall 1950, and the building was completed and ready to be used by October of 1952. The building of the union was initiated by President J.W. Jones, who was president of Northwest from 1945 until 1964. During this time, many improvements were seen on campus. Included in these improvements are Lamkin Gymnasium, Colden Hall, additions and renovations to the Industrial Arts Building and Martindale Gymnasium, the union, and Perrin, Hudson, Colbert, Douglas, and Cooper Halls. Jones was also the first president to have a doctorate and to have previously been employed as a dean at Northwest before becoming president. In 1955, the building was named after the man who had dedicated so much time and energy to see its construction.

Bell Tower

Idea of a bell tower on campus came from President Foster, who wished for it to enhance the campus and serve as a memorial for alumni and faculty who had passed away and for those who died in war. The construction of the bell tower was made possible through the generous donation of alumni. It took five years from its first inception until ground was finally broken for the project. The bell tower was finished in 1971. The tower was replaced and renovated in 2004 and continues to offer students across campus an opportunity to enjoy its music.

Mabel Cook

The Home Management House was changed to become the home of Admissions and Visitor Center for the university. Its purpose is to help students who want information about Northwest and its admissions. It arranges for campus tours and meetings with faculty. The building is named for Mable Cook who was the daughter of T.H. Cook, came up with the idea of Kappa Omicron Nu, which is a national home economics honor society, was a faculty member and later chair of the Department of Human Environmental Sciences.

Garett Strong

May 31, 1968, Garrett-Strong was dedicated as the new residence for the mathematics and science departments. Construction of the over 100,000 square foot structure cost $3,000,000. The building was located on the site of where the Vet's Village, the married housing, had been previously. It was decided that the building would be named for two men who had made long and great contributions to these departments at Northwest, Mr. William T. Garrett and Dr. J Gordon Strong. Dr. Strong had served in the science and math department of Northwest for 21 years, 1943 to 1964. During this time, he served as chairman for the department of physical science and also the department of science and mathematics. Mr. Garrett had also been a long-time member of the university's faculty, with thirty-eight years of service from 1927 to 1965. He had become chair of the biology department after five years of becoming a member of its faculty and helped see this department grow and advance.

Alumni House

In 1980, a group of alumni came together to purchase the historic Townsend House, so named after the family that had lived in and owned the home. This structure would be renovated and restored to be the home and office of Development and Alumni Services. It is utilized for numerous and present students of Northwest.

Mary Linn Performing Arts

Following the fire in the Administration building, President B.D. Owens decided to construct a new library and performing arts center instead of rebuilding the section of the Administration building that had been destroyed in the fire. The main theater and its department and offices had been located in the section that was destroyed. The new performing arts center was finished in 1984. It received the name Mary Linn Performing Arts Center after Board Regents member, Mary Casteel Linn. Money was donated in her name to ensure the building's completion.

Ryland Milner Complex

The gymnasium complex is currently named the Ryland Milner Complex after Ryland Milner. Milner had an outstanding career as Northwest student athlete, faculty, member, and coach. During World War II, Milner went to overseas to train army officers who wished to coach their men.

Robert F. Foster Aquatic Center

The aquatic center was opened in 1981. It has a six lane, 25 meter pool that is meant to be used for instructional recreational purpose. It is named for Robert F. Foster, the president of the university 1964 to 1977.

BD Owens Library

Following the fire in the Administration Building, President B.D. Owens decide to construct a new library and performing arts center instead of rebuilding the section of the Administration building that had been destroyed in the fire. The old library, Well's Hall would be used for classrooms and the campus radio and television stations. B.D. Owens Library was completed in 1983 and was named after the president who initiated its construction and was president of the university from 1977 to 1984.

Tower Suite

The two buildings, East Tower Suites and West Suites were constructed to meet the changing demands of student housing. They were ready for their first occupants in the fall of 2004. These consist of 2 or 4 person suites with bathrooms within the rooms, all furnishings, and laptop.

The Station

The building was constructed in 1966 and was first known as Taylor Commons dining hall after Henry Taylor, the president of the university 1909 to 1913. It served as the dining hall for the high rises until it was renovated to become the Conference Center. It was then used for meetings and banquets. In fall 2004, after receiving extensive work and changes, it opened as the Station. A coffee shop, convenience store, Textbook Services, computers, television, and conference rooms have all been added. The building also functions as the front desk of the Tower Suits.

Thompson Ringold

In May 1975, the building's name was changed from the Industrial Arts Building to Thompson-Ringold. Howard W. Ringold had been a member of this department since 1945, and Kenneth T. Thompson had served there since 1942. The construction of Donald N.Valk Industrial Arts lessened the burden of lack of space for industrial arts. Over the years the building has been home to many different departments, offices, and groups.

Forest Village Apartments

These apartments were constructed to meet the changing demands of student housing. They were ready for their first occupants in the fall of 2004. Apartments consist of 4 or 2 bedrooms, a bathroom for every two people, kitchen, laundry, all furnishings, and laptop computers for every resident.