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Northwest Missouri State University


DeLuce Family Objects

Domestic Objects

Domestic Objects

By examining the DeLuce Family Objects, one will have intimate glimpses into the daily life of a privileged 19th century New York family.  The items are too diverse and numerous to list here, but close examination of items illustrate family values, economic status and cultural traditions. For example, a small tapestry sampler, which is proudly signed, Wrought in 1854 by Emma A Budlong, Aged 8 Years, represents the cardinal numbers and letters of the alphabet, in both cursive and block form, and demonstrates the value of literacy combined with traditional household skills. Also in this section are painting easels and other tools essential to an artist of the day.

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Furniture

Furniture

The furniture in the collection is primarily 19th century and was used in the home of Olive DeLuce at her Maryville residence. However, the most unique items in the collection were, by family tradition, thought to be passed down through the generations. These items include;

  • two French Empire-style chairs with Dolphin fruitwood chairs;
  • one Rococo Revival style chair with cabriole front legs;
  • one Victorian Rococo Revival style love seat with cabriole legs and a tri-lobed carved back;
  • one three-legged table and ogive legs;
  • one Chippendale style armless chair;
  • one Duncan Phyfe style drop-leaf table that was probably acquired by Olive DeLuce in the early 20th century;
  • one dining table with four straight carved legs plus a center support

Older furniture include:

  • a late 1700s or early 1800s English-made (or designed) game table with four cabriole legs and a hinged top to open and swivel 90 degrees;
  • an armless Bergère, French Rococo style chair with cabriole legs, also called a Boudoir chair;
  • one three-legged table with tilting top and ogive legs;
  • six Duncan Phyfe X back chairs with curved in legs and possibly the original upholstery; these are thought to be either original Duncan Phyfe from the late 1700s or from a Duncan Phyfe workshop.

Boulle Writing Desk:

This rare French desk was likely made by Andre Charles Boulle (1642-1732), the cabinet-maker to Louis XIV. These desks were made in the first part of his career and were not signed. It is inlaid with tortoise shell over Chinese Red lacquer and inlaid with brass and has thin cabriole legs other parts painted with black lacquer and is decorated with gilt cast metal ornaments. It has one center drawer below with a lift-up writing surface. The upper part has two side-by-side drawers and two doors above with enclosed shelves. The top portion rests with pegs on the lower desk. This desk was used by Percival DeLuce in his studio as seen in photographs and is included in several of his paintings, most clearly in The First Letter.

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