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Northwest Missouri State University


News Release

July 12, 2017

New humanities, social science journal showcasing student research

Northwest Missouri State University’s Department of Humanities and Social Sciences this summer has launched a digital journal for undergraduate research.

The inaugural issue of “Scholastica” is aimed at all Northwest students conducting research in the humanities and social sciences field, not just in the department but throughout the campus. 

Dr. Dawn Gilley, the chair of Northwest’s Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Dr. Robert Voss, assistant professor of history, are co-editors of the digital journal, which attempts to mimic the academic publishing process that professional scholars experience.

“We talk a great deal here at Northwest about career-readiness and hands-on learning,” Gilley said. “For those of us in the humanities and social sciences, where such things do not seem to be as obvious, this journal is evidence of students’ preparation for the so-called ‘real world’ and their ability to succeed in that world. 

“For the students looking to continue on in academia, the experience provides a taste of what it means to be a professional scholar. For those not continuing their education in academia, a line on a résumé showing a published work can indicate to a potential employer that the candidate has proven communication and research skills.”

The inaugural issue highlights the work of three Northwest students who completed research projects in major-specific courses. A paper authored by Charles Killgore, a senior social science education major from St. Joseph, Missouri, titled “The Jazz Age,” discusses how jazz music reflects the African American experience; Aaron Moser, a senior geography major from Burlington Junction, Missouri, wrote “The American Exception,” which challenges Immanuel Wallerstein’s World-Systems theory; and Kelli Newhall, a senior social science education major from Norwalk, Iowa, submitted “Lord Kitchener: Success and Failure with the New Armies,” which reviews Lord Kitchener and his success and failures with the new British Army during World War I.

The journal, which is copyrighted and registered with the Library of Congress, will be published twice a year and is funded in part by an Academic Initiative grant through Northwest’s College of Arts and Sciences. It is part of a larger project called “Digital Humanities Northwest,” a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort to showcase undergraduate excellence in the humanities through all forms of media.

“‘Scholastica’ and its parent project, ‘Digital Humanities Northwest,’ bridge the gap between the digital and the traditionally print worlds of the humanities and, in this regard, they bridge the gap between history, humanities and the STEM fields,” Voss said.

The journal is not limited to traditional, written research projects and is open to projects created in multiple media formats. Gilley said the department could also open the journal to national or even international submissions.

Undergraduate students interested in submitting a project for consideration in the journal should consult the submission information found under the “Scholastica” tab on the “DH Northwest” website at dhnorthwest.org.

Dr. Michael Steiner, Northwest’s associate provost of undergraduate studies and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, commended the faculty for their efforts to create the opportunity to showcase student research.

“It will indeed provide an opportunity for students to apply the skills they are developing in research, critical thinking and communication through an authentic medium,” Steiner said. “I look forward to reading the product of their work.”

To access Scholastica, visit scholastica.dhnorthwest.org.


For more information, please contact:

Mark Hornickel, Communication Manager
mhorn@nwmissouri.edu | 660.562.1704 | Fax: 660.562.1900

Northwest Missouri State University
215 Administration Building | 800 University Drive | Maryville, MO 64468