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Northwest Missouri State University


Emergency Evacuation Guidelines for Persons with Disabilities

Pre Emergency Preparation for Everyone:

Emergency Response for Persons with Disabilities:

 

Other University Emergency Resources:

Pre Emergency Preparation for Everyone:

  1. Be familiar with buildings and their exits.
  2. Be familiar with the campus emergency alarm system. The Simplex alarm system is specific in its instructions to take cover or to evacuate the building.
  3. Be aware of weather conditions and be proactive. Stay inside and on the ground floor whenever possible during tornado and/or severe thunderstorm watches.

Student Responsibilities:

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Faculty/Staff Responsibilities:

Faculty and staff:

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General Fire Evacuation Procedure:

In the event of a fire alarm:

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General Tornado Evacuation Procedure:

In the event of a tornado:

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Emergency Response for Persons with Disabilities:

Persons with Mobility Limitations:

Adapted from: Ball State University

Additional Evacuation Considerations:

Adapted from: Ball State University

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Visually Impaired Persons:

Most visually impaired persons will be familiar with the immediate area they are in.

In the event of an emergency:

Adapted from: Ball State University

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Hearing Impaired Students

Since persons with impaired hearing may not perceive audio emergency alarms, an alternative warning technique is required. The Simplex alarm strobe lights will help provide visual warning.

Two methods of warning are the following:

  1. Write a note telling what the emergency is and the nearest evacuation route. (Example: "Fire -- go out rear door to right and down. Now!")
  2. Turn the light switch on and off to gain attention, and then indicate through gestures or in writing what is happening and what to do.

It may be prudent to escort the hearing impaired person as you leave the building.

Adapted from: Ball State University

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Diabetic Students: Diabetic Reactions

Insulin reaction/shock:

Results from too rapid a drop in blood sugar levels when a diabetic has eaten too little or exercised too much.

Symptoms:

Comes on rapidly and includes extreme hunger, nervousness, perspiration, skin pale and moist, thirsty, rapid pulse and increasing confusion progressing to unconsciousness.

Diabetic Coma (rare):

Results from insufficient insulin. Develops more slowly than insulin shock but is more serious.

Symptoms:

NOTE: Always look for an identifying bracelet which may reveal a person's condition.

Adapted from: Penn State University

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Epileptic Students:

First Aid for Seizures

Source: Epilepsy Foundation of America

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