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Northwest Bearcats

Press Release

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Aug. 21, 2013

Trevor Adams Reflects on Summer in Haiti

By David Boyce

After completing his last final as a junior, Northwest Missouri quarterback Trevor Adams headed home to Odessa, Texas to relax.

Adams knew he was going to spend the bulk of his summer back in Maryville, lifting weights, bonding with teammates and preparing for his last season of college football.

Many responsibilities are heaped on the shoulders of the starting quarterback for Northwest. The Bearcats expect to compete and win conference and national championships each season.

Northwest football fans see Adams as No. 15 on Saturday afternoons in the fall. He is the player who passed for 2,515 yards and 23 touchdowns last season.

There is so much more to Adams than a talented quarterback who gives everything he has whether he is having a great game or is battling through adversity on the field.

Adams cares about those less fortunate. He wants to make a difference.

An example of his willingness to help others occurred May 13 through May 20. Instead of staying home for several weeks, he joined a group of 10 people and went to Haiti to help with small projects at an orphanage and a mountain village.

The group was organized by Garrett Hawk, the minister at Christian Campus House and Mike Bellamy, an associate professor of chemistry at Northwest.

“We didn’t go over with one big project,” Adams said. “We finished up helping build a basketball court.

“Part of the group would help with laundry. A lot of it was going over there and loving on the kids and the orphans who were in the orphanage.”

Adams was the only Northwest athlete in the group. Three of the students are members of the Phi Mu sorority and two others are from the Christian Campus House.

“One of the cool projects was done by Phi Mu sorority,” Adams said. “They had a water project. They raised money last semester and took that over there. We checked out their water situation. They have tanks they use to collect rain and they use it for crops and drinking.” The journey to Haiti and seeing how others who have so little but still go through life with a smile helped Adams to strengthen his faith in God.

Anybody who has spent time with Adams knows he has a strong relationship with God. He praises Him after games. It is a significant part of who he is.

But in day to day life, Adams said there are material things like cell phones that can distract you from God.

One of the great parts about the mission to Haiti was the minimal use of cell phones. Adams used his to take a few pictures. He checked his e-mail once.

His main focus was to help out with chores at the orphanage and showing the orphans that there are people out there who want to help.

“What I notice that there are lots of distractions that distract us away from who God is in America,” Adams said. “I’m not saying that to be rude.

“It is so easy to pick up your phone and check weather, sports, e-mail. Being away from that, I really enjoyed it because it gets you away from everything and allows you to focus on what the mission trip is for.”

Adams and the rest of the group knew they were visiting a very poor country. You can’t help but want to literally give the shirt of your back to help out.

“It was a blessing for me,” Adams said. “When I went over there, my expectation was that I felt I needed to leave all my clothes and things for them.

“But seeing how they were satisfied in God over there, they took each day as a gift from God. “Their thinking is, ‘I got some clothes on my back. It doesn’t matter how many I have, I have some.’ So they were so satisfied in who Jesus was and he saved them that they were able to enjoy life.”

It’s a powerful moment for college students to experience, to see people in the depths of poverty and still find happiness because of their faith in God.

“When times get tough here, it is so easy to pull out my cell phone and check something or I can run and grab some fast food,” Adams said. “In Haiti, when you are only getting a couple meals a day, maybe, they are so dependent on God. Seeing their dependence on God was contagious for me because it showed me that there are things that distract me from being dependent on God.

“It grew me a lot. Getting out on your own and away from things that are comfortable to you really makes you grow. It forces you to grow. It allowed me to grow as a man and that was cool. I’d say it is a thing a lot of people should go and do if they have a chance.” The experience also helped Adams realize mission work can take place wherever you are at.

“For me, doing a mission trip like that made me see the importance of doing missions in America,” he said. “My advice is we don’t have to go to the far ends of the earth on a mission trip to make an impact. We can make an impact here in Maryville. We can make an impact in the places God called us to be right now. That was the big thing for me.

“This mission trip was incredible and it really opened my eyes to lots of stuff that goes on back home that I can be an impact at home as well.”


For more information, please contact:

Media Relations Department, Northwest Athletics
sid@nwmissouri.edu | 660.562.1118 | Fax: 660.562.1582

Northwest Athletics
Lamkin Activity Center | 800 University Drive | Maryville, MO 64468