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Northwest Missouri State University


Student Spotlight

Northwest student Dennae Moore spent his summer as a geological interpreter in Shenandoah National Park where he explained the impacts of climate change and geologic history to a variety of groups. He said talking to members of the Youth Conservation Corps, above, about his experience with college, internships and geology was among the highlights of the internship.

Northwest student Dennae Moore spent his summer as a geological interpreter in Shenandoah National Park where he explained the impacts of climate change and geologic history to a variety of groups. He said talking to members of the Youth Conservation Corps, above, about his experience with college, internships and geology was among the highlights of his work. In the photo below, he talks with a group about geologic events that created one of many talus slopes in Shenandoah National Park. (Submitted photos)

Aug. 16, 2013

Student gains experience with prestigious GeoCorps internship

By Elisa Lanter, media relations assistant

Northwest student Dennae Moore talks with a group about geologic events that created one of many talus slopes in Shenandoah National Park. Northwest Missouri State University student Dennae Moore took his skills from the classroom to a national park this summer with GeoCorps America at Shenandoah National Park.

GeoCorps is a program sponsored by the Geological Society of America and offers short-term geoscience positions in national parks, forests and properties of the Bureau of Land Management.

GeoCorps offers approximately 70 internships each year that attract 15,000 applicants. Moore was among 42 applicants nationwide vying for a position as geological interpreter at Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Va.

As a geological interpreter, Moore hosted hikes and junior ranger programs, staffed the visitor’s center, and explained the impacts of climate change and geologic history to a variety of audiences.

“I had the opportunity to talk with a group from the Youth Conservation Corps,” Moore said. “It was a great honor to share my experience of college, internships and geology with aspiring geology majors.”

While Moore had a supervisor during his internship, most of his daily activities were executed on his own. His learned from feedback he received from guests and fellow park rangers.

“The internship helped me learn how to accept criticism and feedback,” Moore said. “I now know how to learn from it and apply it to my work.”

Moore, an environmental geology major from St. Louis, also is a member of the Bearcat cheerleading squad.

“Northwest not only provided me with knowledge in my area of study, but also with life skills,” Moore said. “I gain all of my knowledge from instructors in the geology department and from fellow students, while I also gain confidence from cheerleading.”

GeoCorps America was established in 1997 through a partnership with the National Park Service’s Geoscientists-In-the-Parks program. Since its beginning, GeoCorps has had nearly 800 program participants.

For more information about Northwest’s Department of Natural Sciences and its programs, including geology, click here.

For more information, please contact:

Mark Hornickel, Media Relations Specialist
mhorn@nwmissouri.edu | 660.562.1704 | Fax: 660.562.1900

Northwest Missouri State University
215 Administration Building | 800 University Drive | Maryville, MO 64468