2010 Sessions

  1. Quick and Dirty Library Promotions
  2. Eric Jennings, Reference & Instruction Librarian
    University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI

    Kathryn Tvaruzka, Education Reference Librarian
    University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI

    In today's economy, money for promotion of library services is at a premium. Find out how the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire's McIntyre Library has inexpensively changed the atmosphere and has broken stereotypes typically associated with the library and librarians through library promotions and activities.

    Click to view the abstract

    As a result of these efforts, the library has seen an increase in communication and participation between departments and increased door counts. By changing the atmosphere in the library and challenging stereotypes associated with librarians, the library has become a fun and productive place of work for library staff in addition to a place where students, faculty, and staff want to meet friends, study, or conduct research.


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  1. Leveraging Technology, Improving Service: Streamlining Student Billing Procedures
  2. Colleen S. Harris, Head of Access Services
    University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN

    The NCSU Libraries, in coordination with the University cashier's office, has automated billing for library fees and fines resulting in better service to patrons, a more than 100% increase in resolution rate, and more consistent treatment of fines collection.

    Click to view the abstract


    Consequences of this system included that a student may have his or her account blocked at the Library but have no indication of those charges on their university statement, thus being surprised (and inevitably upset) at the service desk when they were told they may not check items out until their account was clear. In addition, due to delays in sending over the bills, a student might pay the library before the bill had hit their account at the cashier's office, the result being that the student pays the fine, clears it at the library, and later the captured bill is entered into their student account, creating a new bill, and blocking the student from registering all for a bill they have already paid. Another consequence of this system was the incredible investment of staff time. Staff had to look at an ILS report to see which lost book charges were paid at the library, make a list and request that the Cashier's office credit those student accounts. Another report from the Cashier's office reporting library bills paid was sent to staff who then had to manually input each payment into the corresponding student record in the ILS to reflect the change.

    Through coordination between the Access Services department, the library's Finance & Business office, the ILS administrator from the IT department, as well as the university's Cashier office, the NCSU Libraries implemented an automated billing script. All charges created on student accounts by the ILS, as well as all bills paid at the Library and entered into the patron record in the ILS, now go to the Cashier's office daily in a file which is uploaded and applied to student accounts. Working on this project allowed us to revisit the library's fines and fees schedule, identify which library units were charging users for services, update the Library's Web site information for clarity, maximize the use of the tools available within the ILS for notification of charges, and address issues with the fine petitioning process.

    Challenges we encountered during the implementation included: coordinating between university offices; finding that due to technological limitations, the automated billing script only works for bills created on or after the implementation date; dealing with the impact of failure to properly discharge items at the service desk; and experiencing increased fine petitions now that the student population is more informed about library charges accrued.

    The results of the project have been incredible. Before the implementation of sending all library charges to student accounts, nearly 85% of those charges were never resolved. Within three months of the implementation, the resolution rate is nearly 80%. The Access & Delivery Services department instituted quality control for discharging items to reduce erroneous billing, and the incidence of students petitioning fines has increased. Students find it easier to pay their library fines now that they are included in their university accounts, since the cashier's office provides online payment options (while the Library does not). The Libraries are considering going cashless at service points now that library fines can be paid online directly to the cashier, and are hoping to implement the second half of the project, which will automate bill payment information from the cashier's office into the ILS.

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  1. Powerful Partnerships & Great Opportunities: Promoting Archival Resources and Optimizing Outreach to Public and K12 Community
  2. Lea Worcester, Public Services Librarian
    University of Texas, Arlington, TX

    Evelyn Barker, Instruction & Information Literacy Librarian
    University of Texas, Arlington, TX

    UT Arlington librarians will describe partnerships formed with local and educational organizations to optimize outreach efforts to the public and K12 community. They also will demonstrate online outreach services developed with other organizations that offer primary source maps, images, and documents from UT Arlington Library Special Collections.

    Click to view the abstract

    UT Arlington librarians describe partnerships formed with local cultural and educational organizations to optimize outreach efforts to the public and K12 community. They also demonstrate online outreach services developed with other organizations that offer primary source maps, images, and documents from UT Arlington Library Special Collections.

    As part of the library's goal to interact with our community, the University of Texas Arlington Library has made several reproductions of historic items and made these items directly available to teachers. The library has also initiated other efforts to share primary sources through local media, YouTube, and Web sites.

    During our presentation, we cover the following points:

    • How we developed partnerships with local institutions
    • How we adapted unique historic archival material for use in schools
    • How we promote our finished products
    • What lessons we have learned
    • Community response to our efforts

    Objectives for the session:

    • How to look for collaboration opportunities in your community
    • How academic libraries can use their collections to promote themselves to the K-12 community
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  1. Mobile Patrons: Better Services on the Go
  2. Vincci Kwong, Head of Web Services
    Indiana University, South Bend, IN

    Gary Browning, Manager of Web Services
    Indiana University, South Bend, IN

    This session will discuss several mobile friendly initiatives which improve mobile user's experience with library resources. These initiatives include creation of a mobile library Web site, development of mobile friendly authentication user interface, implementation of a computer availability mobile page and offering a texting reference service.

    Click to view the abstract

    iPhone? Android? BlackBerry? With increasing mobile usage for web browsing, does your library offer services which improve mobile devices user experience? At the Franklin D. Schurz Library, we have implemented several mobile friendly initiatives in order to improve mobile user's experience with library resources. Due to the small display screen of mobile devices, we created a mobile version of our library Web site. The mobile version works across different platforms regardless of device type. In order to enable patrons to access our subscribed databases through their mobile device, we developed a mobile friendly authentication user interface so they can authenticate with the system easily. In addition, to facilitate the use of library resources through mobile devices, we implemented a computer availability mobile page which enables users to checkout availability of computing stations in the library. As usage of texting continues to rise, the Schurz Library also introduced a texting reference service which allows users to receive an answer to their question through texting.
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  1. ERMes: An Open Source ERM
  2. Galadriel Chilton, Electronic Resources Librarian
    University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI

    In 2008, William Doering and Galadriel Chilton designed a simple open source Electronic Resource Management System using Microsoft Access. Now called ERMes, more than 30 institutions from around the world use ERMes. In this presentation, Chilton shares ERMes' history and demonstrates how she uses it to manage her university's e-resources.

    Click to view the abstract

    In 2008, William Doering and Galadriel Chilton designed a simple open source Electronic Resource Management System. Now called ERMes, more than 30 institutions from around the world use this freely available tool. In this presentation, Galadriel shares ERMes' history and demonstrates how she uses ERMes to manage her university's e-resources.

    Created in Microsoft Access, ERMes provides reports and functionality that facilitate better management of e-resources, such as keeping track of training sessions and quickly generating a list of databases by renewal, access type, user limits, etc. Since ERMes is open source, users can customize and adjust their instance to suit their e-resource management workflow. As of early 2010, ERMes is ideal for small to medium e-resource collections or as a tool to transition to a commercial system. Hide this content.

  1. All Stressed Out? Enumerating and Eliminating Stress in the Academic Library
  2. Mary Wilkins Jordan, Assistant Professor
    Simmons College, Boston, MA

    This presentation will share the results of a research project into stressors in academic libraries. Learning about the most common stressors gives librarians a basis for learning skills to help reduce and eliminate stressors. Additionally, the presenter will share group profiles of stressed librarians.

    Click to view the abstract

    The objective of this study is to identify those workplace stressors which affect academic librarians and to discover the most common groupings of stressors faced by those currently working as academic librarians. Developing this information through research, instead of merely using anecdotal evidence, gives the profession a basis on which to build training programs that address the major problems in the workplace. It also assists in the development of policies and procedures which help librarians deal with the foremost sources of stress in their workplace. The methodology for this project is Q Method, a relatively new method to the LIS profession, but its unique blend of quantitative measurement of qualitative factors (such as stress in the workplace) makes it ideal for this type of research. This study is part of a series of research projects into stressors in different types of libraries. At the conclusion of the series, a set of profession-wide recommendations will be made to assist with amelioration of the stressors affecting libraries of all types, along with individualized recommendations.
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  1. But What Did They Learn? What Classroom Assessment Can Tell You About Student Learning
  2. Catherine Pellegrino, Reference Librarian / Instruction Coordinator
    Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, IN

    This presentation compares teaching evaluations with student learning assessments: what does an assessment tell you about what your students are actually learning? We will look at actual results from assessments and see how they helped the presenter improve her teaching. You will leave with examples of student learning assessments that you can implement immediately.

    Click to view the abstract

    Teaching evaluations are commonly used as a tool to improve classroom instruction, both by librarians and by teaching faculty. These evaluations often give you information about how satisfied students are with your information literacy instruction sessions, but they can't tell you very much about what your students are actually learning. And students see so many evaluation forms during their college years that they frequently "tune out" when completing them, leaving you with data that isn't very useful.

    This session compares a typical teaching evaluation with an easy-to-implement classroom assessment technique, with a focus on what each tool can tell you about what your students are learning. The presentation will explore common reasons why evaluations and assessments are used, and consider when it's appropriate to use which tool. We will also examine actual results of a "minute paper" classroom assessment tool and see what the presenter learned from that assessment, and how she changed her teaching as a result.

    Attendees will leave with an understanding of the differences between teaching evaluations and student learning assessments, ideas for implementing student learning assessments in their own classes, and ready-to-use examples of classroom assessment techniques they can implement immediately.
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  1. The Impact of Budget Cuts on Acquisitions Workflow
  2. Clint Wrede, Catalog Librarian/Bibliographer
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA

    Susan Moore, Catalog Librarian/Bibliographer
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA

    Since the Rod Library at the University of Northern Iowa was unable to replace a vital position because of budget cuts, changes needed to be made in the workflow for order processing. Come hear how two catalogers learned to select vendors, copy catalogers learned to place orders electronically, and all helped streamline the acquisitions process.

    Click to view the abstract

    What do you mean we can't replace her?!?!?! When the head of the order placement section took advantage of an early retirement package offered because of budget cuts at the state level, the Technical Services Department at the Rod Library at the University of Northern Iowa was not allowed to refill the position. Duties were redistributed throughout the Technical Services Department and the cataloging section took on many of the order placement tasks. An analysis of the skills of the members of the department helped determine who would be asked to do what. Almost every person in the department had some change in his/her duties. Now almost three months into the reorganization, three individuals involved in the decision making share what is working so far, what still needs adjustment, and lessons learned.


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  1. The Library Through Students' Eyes: Exploring Student Research Needs in the Brick and Click Space
  2. Julie Gilbert, Academic Librarian & Assistant Professor
    Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter, MN

    Anna Hulsberg, Academic Librarian & Assistant Professor
    Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter, MN

    Sarah Monson, Serials Manager
    Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter, MN

    Amy Gratz, Academic Librarian
    Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter, MN

    Wondering what students actually think about your library building and Web site? Are you curious about how to use that information to improve your library? This session describes an ethnographic approach to gathering student-focused data for the purpose of transforming physical and virtual library spaces to better support the research needs of undergraduates.

    Click to view the abstract

    In an ideal world, libraries would have limitless money and time to redesign buildings and Web sites to meet the evolving needs of users. When faced with the realities of flat budgets and outdated physical and virtual spaces, library staff at Gustavus Adolphus College asked how both our library building and Web site could continue to support the research needs of our students. How do we revise the Web site to provide better access to information? What steps can we take to increase students' use of underutilized sources of assistance, such as the Reference Desk? How can we better direct students to information sources within the library? In short, how do we create the best library possible to support our students in their research?

    We knew our decisions needed to be based in data about how our students actually interact with physical and virtual library spaces when they conduct research, as well as information about improvements they would like to see. In order to solicit this vital information, we utilized a range of ethnographic methods. Over the course of a semester, we interviewed students about where they seek help in the library, conducted focus groups to analyze our Web site, coordinated photo diaries documenting the library through students' eyes, and surveyed the student body about the physical building. Our approach was also marked by significant undergraduate involvement in the design and execution of the study. Our findings will help us make the library more conducive to learning and increasingly relevant in the lives of our students by transforming student-focused data into improved physical and virtual library spaces to better support the research needs of undergraduates.

    This session will provide attendees with a framework for collecting and using data gathered from students to improve access to research sources and services. The framework is both scalable and is a sustainable process for continuing to understand how students intersect with library spaces for generations to come. The presenters will also discuss plans for changing our building and Web site as a result of the study and outline an initial assessment plan.


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  1. 23 Things x 600 People = Building an Online Library Learning Experience in Kansas
  2. Heather Braum, Technology Librarian
    Northeast Kansas Library System, Lawrence, KS

    Rebecca Brown, Kansas Outreach and Technology Liaison
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS

    Jan Brooks, Interlibrary Loan Assistant
    Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS

    Diana Weaver, Director
    Atchison Public Library, Atchison, KS

    Overcome obstacles to continuing education with an online, asynchronous program. The statewide consortia of Kansas librarians' successful 23 Things program attracted nearly 600 registrants! Learn how the program was designed, what troubleshooting was needed, what we learned, what's next, and how your organization can create a vibrant 23 Things program.

    Click to view the abstract

    Time restraints, travel, and finances can create barriers for librarians, preventing them from attending continuing education events. 23 Things, originally created by Helene Blowers (http://www.librarybytes.com) is a workable model for asynchronous technology training. The original 2006 program (http://plcmclearning.blogspot.com) helped Blowers' staff to learn new Web 2.0 tools. Since that time, many organizations have initiated similar programs for library staff. This unique concept helps participants create community by self-directing their activities using a framework provided for them online. Participants complete the lessons virtually on their own blogs, writing about their experiences during each lesson.

    After seeing the success of other 23 Things programs, several librarians in Kansas decided to create their own 23 Things program. Through a series of online meetings and a face-to-face discussion at the Kansas Library Unconference, a group of leading mentors evolved. From March 2009 to January 2010, these mentors met in an online meeting room every few months to plan out the program. A logo was created; tools to cover were decided upon; a Web site was built (http://www.23thingskansas.org); lessons were created; publicity on statewide library listservs was sent out; and the program began on January 11, 2010. Almost 600 librarians, library staff, library trustees, and library friends from many of the state's public, school, academic, special and regional libraries, as well as the State Library of Kansas, registered for 30 hours of continuing education credit. We even had a few librarians from outside Kansas and the United States officially participate with us! Countless others followed the lessons on the program Web site. At the time of this abstract's writing, the program is still ongoing through the end of April, and the completion rate is as of yet unknown. However, two months into the 23 Things Kansas program, feedback from participants has been extremely positive, and even in the middle of the program, there's a very good possibility that the program will be repeated in some form in the future.

    Through program mentors Heather Braum, Rebecca Brown, and Diana Weaver, as well as participant Jan Brooks, discover how the 23 Things Kansas program helped librarians across the state of Kansas learn about various technology tools, as well as network with and learn alongside their library peers from different library types. A brief history of the 23 Things program concept will be covered and the creation of the Kansas program will be discussed. Problems and difficulties will be mentioned (including more registered participants' than we ever dreamed of!). Feedback from program participants will be given, future program plans will be discussed, and we will end with advice about how other libraries can start their own 23 Things program.


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  1. Keeping the Baby, Throwing Out the Bathwater: Exporting Cataloging Data from a Commercial ILS into a Locally-Developed Catalog
  2. Rob Withers, Assistant to the Dean and University Librarian
    Miami University, Oxford, OH

    Rob Casson, Computing & Info Support Specialist
    Miami University, Oxford, OH

    The Miami University Libraries have transitioned from using a commercial ILS as their primary catalog interface to a faceted search tool developed in-house. This session will discuss the rationale for the change, technologies and technical skills needed to create/maintain the new catalog, challenges encountered, and planned modifications for this product.

    Click to view the abstract

    In fall of 2009, the Miami University Libraries moved from using Innovative Interfaces as its primary catalog interface to an in-house, faceted search tool. The newly adopted interface downloads information from the Libraries' Innovative system, but allows users the ability to modify searches with search facets (dropdown menus familiar to many users from site such as Amazon.com). In addition, it enables users to browse the collection based on facets, without having to enter a specific search term (meaning that there is now a simple answer to a question like "what videos to you have?"). During implementation of this product, we have acted upon user responses received through feedback from the Libraries' newly redesigned Web site, focus groups, and a recently administered LibQUAL Lite survey. Development of a version tailored to mobile devices and an advanced search menu are currently nearing completion.

    This session will provide background on technologies and expertise needed to create the catalog, rationale for replacing the existing catalog interface, challenges posed by data from the catalog, features not available from traditional ILS-provided catalogs, feedback from both external and internal users, and current/planned modifications to this product.
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  1. My InfoQuest : Collaborative SMS Reference Service
  2. Rene Erlandson, Director, Virtual Services
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

    Rachel Erb, Systems Librarian
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

    Are you interested in providing reference service to your patrons via text messaging, but aren't sure you have the resources to successfully support SMS reference locally? Join us to learn about My InfoQuest, the ground-breaking international collaborative project that provides SMS reference service to library patrons throughout North America.

    Click to view the abstract

    Are you interested in providing reference service to your patrons via text messaging, but aren't sure you have the resources to successfully support SMS reference locally? Join us to learn about My InfoQuest, the ground-breaking international collaborative project that provides SMS reference service to library patrons throughout North America. As an original participating member, the University of Nebraska Omaha Criss Library has provided SMS reference service to the UNO community through My InfoQuest since 2009. In addition to answering your questions, we will discuss the basics of My InfoQuest; how your library can participate in the program, what training your staff will need to work on the program, the types of questions answered through the service and supporting documentation for answering local questions in a collaborative environment. So, bring your questions to this session and see if My InfoQuest will work for your library!


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  1. Inquiry, Peer Mentors and Collaboration - Redefining How and When to Teach Library Skills
  2. Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services
    McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

    Embracing small group, self-directed, inquiry learning strategies has led to the establishment of a unique peer mentorship opportunity at McMaster University. This presentation will outline how senior students gain course credit while designing and implementing personal learning strategies, engaging in online collaborative environments and providing peer information literacy learning support.

    Click to view the abstract

    Peer mentoring for academic credit is a well established component of the Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) program at McMaster University. Although the librarians have always been actively engaged curriculum design and planning, it is only recently that they have turned to peer mentors as a means of supporting student learning in the area of information literacy. The purpose of this presentation is to tell the story of how the BHSc Liaison Librarian worked with students to develop an Information Literacy and Library Research Practicum course that embraces the same small group, self-directed, inquiry model that serves as the foundation for the entire BHSc curriculum.

    Within the BHSc program, information literacy embraces both practical skills (finding and evaluating information) and theoretical discourse (understanding the context in which information is created and reflecting on how the research process impacts information demand). Throughout the program's 10 year history, this definition has been interwoven into the inquiry based curriculum, resulting in a variety of demands being placed on the library. However, with the demand has come increased confusion as to how and when the librarian should participate in student learning activities and what kinds of interventions should be planned to facilitate the best possible learning outcomes.

    From this confusion emerged the idea to establish a peer library mentorship program. The purpose of the program has been to create a course through which librarians work with 4th year student mentors to develop enhanced information literacy skills. In turn, the mentors are able to take what they have learned and apply it to their knowledge and experience as it pertains to the uniqueness of their program's curriculum, research demands, online learning communities and population characteristics.

    The first cohort of mentors will complete their work in April 2010 and have promised to leave a legacy document for the next generation of mentors. To date, they have focused on providing informal support by attending group meetings, designing library orientations and creating "testimonial" documents in which they both share their experiences using various library tools and databases and provide links to online tutorials and instruction guides.

    Plans to evaluate the Information Literacy and Library Research Practicum are not fully in place, however, summative course evaluations and student feedback documents will be available at the end of the course.


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  1. From Forgotten Intranet to Successful Wiki: Best Practices for Implementing a Staff Wiki in an Academic Library
  2. Kristen Costello, Systems Librarian
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV

    Darcy Del Bosque, Emerging Technologies Librarian
    University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV

    What makes some new technologies succeed while others fail? Listen to the lessons learned from the transition of the staff intranet at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries to a staff wiki and learn how to implement a wiki that your library staff will actually use!

    Click to view the abstract

    Communication within an academic library can be challenging. The collective nature of wikis and their ability to allow multiple people to edit them have made wikis an ideal technology to help address communication issues within organizations. Successful implementation of a wiki can help to improve communication issues, but only if staff adopt the new technology.

    University of Nevada, Las Vegas libraries implemented an internal staff wiki in 2007 as a replacement communication tool of the staff intranet. Information routinely edited on the wiki includes meeting minutes and committee work, policies and procedures and training materials. This paper illustrates the implementation process by providing an overview of the transition with a focus on what went right and what pitfalls were encountered. Best practices will be presented to illustrate how to successfully implement a wiki that library staff will willingly reference and edit, concluding with recommendations for maintaining the wiki after implementation.
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  1. Lightning Round


    • Current Trends in Library Web site Redesign with CMS/Drupal
    • Elaine Chen, Instructional Design Specialist
      University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA

      Powered by open source CMS software, many academic libraries have redesigned Web sites to implement shareable, reusable, syndicated, and dynamic information for more manageable content and design, and budgets. By evaluating such Web sites, the presenter will share findings for current design/navigation/technology trends in library Web site redesign with CMS/Drupal.

      Click to view the abstract

      The practice of redesigning academic library Web sites with a content management system (CMS) has been thriving tremendously in recent years. Advantages of moving Web sites to a CMS are cited in the reviewed literature. They include: (1) creating a more engaged user experience, increased usability and interactivity, social connectedness, and participation. (2) Librarians and staff no longer need to continuously update their design skills. This is achieved by maintaining the focus on content and production. And (3), for web designers and webmasters, using CMS increases site effectiveness through the use of extensible, scalable, flexible, and customizable modules.

      The three most discussed CMS packages for library Web site are Drupal, Joomla, and WordPress (Gwynn 6-12); all have different usability/functionality features to choose from (Gwynn 3). Today, more than 30 university libraries are utilizing Drupal, including Rod Library at the University of Northern Iowa. However, are these libraries using all of the features mentioned above? Are there any emerging trends for library Web site redesign? And, what can we learn from these redesigned Web sites? The questions will be briefly discussed in the presentation along with design trends, navigation trends, and technology trends gathered from the study.


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    • Purchase on Demand: Using ILL Requests to Influence Acquisitions
    • Amy Soma, Access & Delivery Librarian
      Concordia College, Moorhead, MN

      Explore how one small academic library implemented an acquisitions on demand service using interlibrary loan requests to generate purchases. Topics covered will include workflow procedures, policies, budget issues, pros and cons of the service, and plans for expansion in the near future.

      Click to view the abstract

      During autumn 2009, Carl B. Ylvisaker Library, on the campus of Concordia College, implemented an acquisitions on demand service that used interlibrary loan requests to influence purchase decisions. This project was spearheaded by the Access & Delivery Librarian but impacted several employees in interlibrary loan, acquisitions, and cataloging. Staff from the various departments worked closely to adapt work flow, create policies, and assure that patron satisfaction remained a top priority. Although the service was relatively easy to implement, there were some financial concerns, including allocating money to the project, creating a new budget fund, and experimenting with how much money was needed to make the service useful, and obtaining an Amazon Prime account. To date, the project has been moderately successful and there are plans to expand the service in the future.


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    • Electronic Dissertations and Theses: Issues, Alternatives, & Access
    • Janice Boyer, Cataloging Librarian
      University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

      Electronic submissions of dissertations and theses are growing rapidly and many issues must be identified and resolved for the transition to be successful. Suggestions for those considering electronic submissions will be outlined based on a project that began in 2007 at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

      Click to view the abstract

      The transition from hard copy to electronic submissions of dissertations and theses (ETDs) has gained momentum rapidly since the development of ETDs began in the late 1990’s. The ability of graduate students to include supplemental materials including multimedia files has enhanced the presentation of their work. The library plays an important role in identifying and working through a variety of policy and implementation issues. Whether to house electronic dissertations and theses in institutional repositories or to outsource to a vendor such as UMI is a critical decision that must include the library as a significant stakeholder. Communicating with students and faculty members about the advantages of electronic documents, policy and procedure changes, cataloging, database access, embargoes, costs, and interlibrary loan policies are important issues that must be addressed when an institution is considering this transition.

      The University of Nebraska at Omaha initiated a small pilot project in 2007 with UMI to submit dissertations and theses electronically. During the summer session, only two students participated. The project quickly gained popularity and in 2008 all graduate students were required to submit their dissertation or thesis electronically to UMI. Although there have been some obstacles along the way, the project has been quite successful and suggestions to assist other libraries considering the transition to electronic dissertations and theses will be outlined.
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    • To Buy and Not Borrow - Does it Pay?
    • Brad Reel, Reference & Interlibrary Loan Librarian
      University of Southern Indiana, Evansville, IN

      The ILL staff at the University of Southern Indiana Rice Library conducted a survey of academic libraries with a "buy not borrow" procedure in place, to determine an overall level of satisfaction and measure of success. This session will discuss the methodology, survey results, conclusions, and best practices collected from participants.

      Click to view the abstract

      The University of Southern Indiana Rice Library implemented an Interlibrary Loan Purchase Option procedure in the fall of 2009. The program has proven moderately successful through the first several months, as measured by the volume of requested items purchased rather than borrowed and by the savings of ILL lending fees. The ILL staff at Rice Library will inquire with other college and university libraries with similar "buy not borrow" programs in an effort to both improve upon the current level of success and to gather a collection of best practices. Methodology will include a survey of ILL librarians where such programs are in effect, and response invitations for best practices collected through email, listservs and in print. Survey questions will aim to determine how successful ILL purchase option programs have been for participating academic libraries.

      The results of the proposed survey and response invitations will be shared with all participating libraries. The author will also share a brief summary of the methodology, survey results, conclusions, and best practices.
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  1. A University's Information Literacy Assessment Program Using Google Docs
  2. Ma Lei Hsieh, Assistant Professor I - Librarian
    Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ

    Patricia Dawson, Assistant Professor II - Librarian
    Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ

    Multi-year online surveys developed by the Moore Library of Rider University in New Jersey revealed students' information literacy skill levels in relation to their disciplines, years in college, and number of library sessions previously attended. The results helped librarians communicate with teaching faculty and improve library instruction strategically.

    Click to view the abstract

    The Rider University academic community has adopted information literacy (IL) as one of the core learning objectives for undergraduates. The IL objectives are based on the ACRL IL Competency Standards for Higher Education. The Moore Library developed an online survey to assess students' skills on the first IL objective - identifying various resources. The survey was administered to students who attended library instructional sessions (LIS) in fall 2009. In spring 2010, a new survey was developed to assess students' skills on the second IL objective - developing keyword strategies and accessing relevant information from the most appropriate resources. The surveys for the IL objectives will collect rich data sets to inform the University community of the IL competency of students. The information is valuable for librarians and faculty in planning and incorporating IL into the curriculum of academic departments.

    The results reveal valuable information about students’ IL skill levels, and allow librarians to develop lesson plans to target those IL areas where students need the most help. The information enables librarians to work with faculty on IL concepts that need to be reinforced throughout the semester. Librarians can strategically plan to improve their IL program and request needed resources from administrators to achieve the core IL objectives the University has set for undergraduate students.
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  1. B.D. Owens Library Tour
  2. Glenn Morrow, Facility Manager
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Jerin Adcock, Library Generalist
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Receive a tour of B.D. Owens Library, a service-oriented library in a 116,000 square foot facility designed to meet the varied learning and research needs of Northwest students, faculty, and staff.

    Click to view the abstract

    Receive a tour of B.D. Owens Library, a service-oriented library in a 116,000 square foot facility designed to meet the varied learning and research needs of Northwest students, faculty, and staff. The library collection and services support scholarly research and provide current information that promotes student competencies concerning lifelong learning, critical thinking, communication and research. For those who have taken the tour before, collection locations have changed, computer workstations have relocated, we've started putting new colors on the walls!


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  1. Making Significant Cuts to an Approval Plan without Drawing Any Blood
  2. Lea Currie, Head of Collection Development
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

    The University of Kansas Libraries completed a major approval plan review and introduced a "purchase on demand" service that reduced the approval plan by more than 25%. In this session, participants will learn about a systematic method for reviewing their own approval plan and creating a "purchase on demand" service.

    Click to view the abstract

    The University of Kansas Libraries had not been through a major approval plan review in many years, but with a fiscal deficit looming, it became apparent that cuts would need to be made. Armed with circulation statistics, retrospective titles lists, and spreadsheets that showed what aspects were covered by the approval plan, subject librarians were called to meet together in small groups, based on interdisciplinary interests. With assistance from our YBP approval plan representative, subject librarians tweaked the profile to meet the needs of individual subject areas, while cutting the approval plan by more than 25%. During this review, another idea was formed to offer a "purchase on demand" service. YBP staff members were excited to work with us to set up a profile for this new service. A few subject areas were chosen and monograph records from YBP were loaded into the libraries' catalog based on price and publisher. Library users are given the choice of rush ordering a book by filling out a form attached to the catalog record. A special thanks must be given to the University of Vermont, who were willing to share their experience with a similar service at their libraries. Our representative from YBP has continued to be very flexible about making small changes to the approval plan that have added up to additional savings and made the "purchase on demand" service a success. In this session, participants will learn about a systematic method for reviewing approval plans and creating a "purchase on demand" service for their own libraries. Workflow issues associated with the "purchase on demand" service will also be discussed.


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  1. To Inventory or Not: Findings from Inventory Projects Performed in Two Different Types of Academic Libraries
  2. Jan Sung, Head, Access Services
    University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI

    Nackil Sung, Head, Library Technology Services
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL

    Few libraries are brave enough to claim that they do not need inventory control over their print collections. However, it is long overdue in many academic libraries. The presenters will explore with the audience what prevents libraries from embarking upon an inventory project, or challenges associated with it. The findings from inventory projects performed in two different types of academic libraries, one research library and one medium-size university library, are noted.

    Click to view the abstract

    Few libraries are brave enough to claim that they do not need inventory control over their print collections. However, it is long overdue in many academic libraries. The presenters will explore with the audience what prevents libraries from embarking upon an inventory project, or challenges associated with it. The findings from inventory projects performed in two different types of academic libraries, one research library and one medium-size university library, are noted.

    Eastern Illinois University developed an electronic inventory/shelf-reading program that utilizes a laptop loaded with the program and the electronic shelf-list, and a barcode scanner attached to the laptop. As book barcodes are scanned, they are compared to the shelf-list for a predefined call number range to determine the correct position based on call number sorting rules. If the item has a status of anything other than "not charged," the system notifies the operator. Notification takes the form of color changes on the computer screen and computer-generated sounds. This instant notification of problems, while staff is still in the stacks, saves time and energy. It also helps staff identify items with inaccurate spine labels. At the end of each session, the system generates a list of items which are supposed to be on shelf but are not. All items with an active status were set aside for examination at a later time by professional staff. The system also notifies staff for those items not found within the shelf-list. In this case, the item may be outside the defined call number range or location, or have a broken or no link to a bibliographic record. At the end of each session, the system generates a list of items with the status "not charged" which were not scanned simply because they were not on shelf. This list may include items without barcodes, so that they cannot be scanned even though they are on shelf.

    There are many advantages to the system. The interaction between the computer and staff makes it more interesting (or less boring) than the traditional shelf reading or comparing spine call numbers to those printed on paper. Perhaps most important is the increase in accuracy of the bibliographic records and the increased accessibility of the materials on shelf.

    Each library has its own challenges, which may hinder many libraries from considering inventory control especially in times of financial difficulties: the sheer number of books can be overwhelming; what will you do when 20% of your books are without barcodes?; when books are on shelf but not in the system, who will decide to keep/catalog them or simply discard them?; if your inventory project results in other librarians’ significant involvement, how would you collaborate with them when this can be perceived as extra work? Finally, we need to think very carefully if an inventory is necessary when we are facing the impending reality of a massive withdrawal of books from our stacks. Please come and share your experiences with us.
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  1. Lightning Round


    • Thursdays at the Library - or "Be careful what you wish for!"
    • Joyce A. Meldrem, Library Director
      Loras College Library, Dubuque, IA

      With "everything" being available on the Internet these days, how do libraries go about bringing the people on campus into their building? Learn how something simple like serving free coffee once a week is now drawing almost 200 extra people into the Loras College Library on Thursday mornings.

      Click to view the abstract

      Loras College Library started an event that we call "Thursdays at the Library" five years ago (Fall 2005) to draw people into the building. "Thursdays" is part of an active marketing program at the Loras College Library that includes Homecoming events, Finals Week events, National Library Week, READ posters, new and transfer student orientation, faculty newsletter, campus newspaper articles, bathroom ads, and a library blog. While mention will be made of all of these events, the primary focus will be on how our "Thursdays" event grew from serving 30 cups of coffee each week to now serving over 400 cups of beverages including coffee, hot chocolate, apple cider, and tea each week. We've used things like new books, popular reading materials, entertainment DVDs, free magazines, cold drinks, and food to help add to the draw. We've also surveyed people, gone green, and have punch cards. What's worked, what hasn't worked, and ideas for the future will be shared.
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    • Say This, Not That: Library Instruction for International Students in Intensive English Programs
    • Andrea Malone, Modern & Classical Languages Librarian
      University of Houston, Houston, TX

      Library jargon can be extremely puzzling for international students who are still learning English. Though these students have the universal need to acquire information literacy skills, delivery of their instruction sessions must incorporate their need to understand a culturally different academic environment.

      Click to view the abstract

      International students in colleges and universities nationwide are often overwhelmed from being immersed in a new culture. They not only struggle with new societal challenges, but find their place in academic surroundings strikingly different from that of their home environments. Add to this mélange the stress of not speaking well the language of their new academic institution and the potential for academic success may waver. This scenario is not at all unlikely for the international students who are attending an intensive English program and hope to learn English well enough to succeed academically in a United States college or university. As librarians, teaching this unique group of students can be challenging for both instructor and student. Avoiding library jargon is often easier said than done. And though it is avoided, does the chosen vocabulary make sense to students who are still in the process of learning English? The language barrier may be an obstacle, but it is one that can be overcome so that the students will gain sufficient knowledge about the methods of successfully navigating academic libraries.
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    • There Are No Limits to Learning! Academic and High School Libraries Collaborate to Teach Information Literacy to High School Seniors
    • Jeff Simpson, Evening Reference/Electronic Resources Librarian
      Troy University, Montgomery, AL

      Effective collaboration can enhance the development of students' information literacy skills and contribute to academic success. This can be especially true when university and public high school librarians partner to teach library information literacy and research skills to high school seniors. Experience the successes and difficulties encountered during this collaboration.

      Click to view the abstract

      Effective collaboration can enhance the development of students' information literacy skills and contribute to academic success. Troy University's (Montgomery, Alabama, campus) Rosa Parks Library and the Montgomery Public Schools’ Robert E. Lee High School Library partnered with a common goal: To teach library information literacy and research skills to high school seniors - soon to be incoming college freshmen. By improving information literacy and research skills, students benefit in their educational environments and in their level of preparedness for entry into the University academic arena. Through collaboration, academic librarians and school media specialists developed specialized training profiles for high school seniors that were tailored to meet individual teacher requirements. The collaborative instruction began in September 2009 and currently, thirteen sessions have been presented to more than 280 students, including students in advanced placement classes. This joint effort is expected to continue to grow in scope and coverage, as additional requests for training are received. Pros and cons of developing unique instruction profiles and varying participation levels will be highlighted. An overview of the successes, as well as the difficulties encountered during the collaboration will be described in this session and will serve as encouragement for other librarians to initiate joint programs.
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    • "A Living Book"
    • Shuqin Jiao, Assistant University Librarian for Access Services
      Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO

      Come hear about the "A Living Book" initiative that drew the attention of the Provost’s Office at Saint Louis University and find out how this project has progressed and the benefits it has brought to students, the library, and the university community at large as well as to the librarian herself.

      Click to view the abstract

      Inspired by a news item, "A ‘Living Library’ That Opens Minds," Shu, a librarian from Saint Louis University initiated a project called "Shu, A Living Book for International Students." The purpose of this project is to provide a unique service to help the dramatically increased number of Chinese international students on campus.

      Shu, with her name literally meaning "book" in Chinese, makes herself available as "a living book" to the Chinese international students at Saint Louis University. The areas of expertise she provides are library orientation, cross-cultural orientation, international student experience, student adjustment and foreign student survival tips. The primary method of interaction is chatting and the service offered is bilingual, both English and Chinese.

      Shuqin (Shu) Jiao, the head of Access Services at Pius Memorial XII Library, Saint Louis University, will share her remarkable stories with this new approach of serving the students experiencing language and cultural barriers. The presentation will briefly discuss how this project progressed and what the benefits and impacts have been to the Chinese international students, the library, and the Saint Louis University community at large.


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  1. Boost Your Use: Promoting E-Resources to Students and Faculty
  2. Amy Fry, Electronic Resources Coordinator
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH

    This session will present low-cost techniques for promoting e-resources on college campuses. The presentation will provide a summary of relevant literature, give an overview of marketing approaches for library resources, and describe a promotional plan developed at Bowling Green State University.

    Click to view the abstract

    Libraries invest lots of time, money, and expertise acquiring and providing access to databases and e-journals, but we are often disappointed by how little our users know about what is available to them. This session will present low-cost techniques for promoting e-resources on college campuses. The presentation will provide a summary of relevant literature, give an overview of marketing approaches for library resources, and describe a promotional plan developed at Bowling Green State University in spring 2010. This plan involved using social networking and Web 2.0 technology, identifying a range of communication channels, mobilizing public services staff, drawing on data (usage and usability) to design appropriate messages, and using repetition to enhance recall.


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  1. Embedded Librarianship: A Briefing from the Trenches
  2. Galadriel Chilton, Electronic Resources Librarian
    University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI

    Jenifer Holman, Periodicals Librarian
    University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI

    Based on 3 years of face-to-face work as embedded librarians, we explain how our work with students has evolved and why embedded librarianship is not only effective and pedagogically appropriate for information literacy instruction, but is integral to informing our practice of librarianship.

    Click to view the abstract

    Though the concept of embedded librarianship as a form of information literacy instruction is not new, the idea of an "embedded librarian" is a popular trend in our profession. While there are numerous articles, blog posts, and presentations describing librarians' experiences as embedded librarians, we propose a presentation on not only our work as embedded librarians, but also theoretical reasons why embedded librarianship is pedagogically appropriate for information literacy instruction.

    Embedded librarianship is one form of information literacy instruction that helps establish librarians and libraries as trusted information sources for college students. Embedded librarianship also benefits librarians as they gain an intricate understanding of students' information seeking behaviors, their assignments, and the teaching faculty's expectations.

    Based on 3 years of face-to-face work as embedded librarians for undergraduate students, we explain how our work with students has evolved and why embedded librarianship is not only an effective means of information literacy instruction, but also integral to informing our practice of librarianship - specifically periodicals and e-resource management.

    Included in our presentation are the benefits and challenges of embedded librarianship, descriptions of our experiences, what we see students learning, and why we believe that embedded librarians are in a prime position to establish trust between students and librarians. By establishing trust at the beginning of a student's college experience, we are fostering library use throughout their college career.

    Our presentation is informed in part by 19-years of information literacy teaching between us (three as embedded librarians), and Galadriel's Masters in Education with an emphasis in educational technology and instructional design.


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  1. Managing the Multi-generational Library
  2. Colleen S. Harris, Head of Access Services
    University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN

    Today, as many as four generations work within the library, each with its unique work style. Learn how to get your boomers, Millennials, Gen X-ers and Gen Y folks to work well together as a group and create synergistic teams to energize your library initiatives.

    Click to view the abstract

    In today's libraries, there are as many as four generations working within the organization, each with its own traditions, work ethic, and values. These include employees from the veteran, baby-boomer, Gen-X, and Gen Y generations. While academic libraries involved in instruction are highly aware of addressing how different learning styles influence development of teaching resources, often less library management attention is paid to the different working styles of multiple generations and how to integrate them into successful work teams. As Gen-X librarians make up a larger part of library management and administration, Gen-Y employees are part of the library workforce, Millennials comprise our student workforce, and Boomers put off retirement, it behooves us to understand how we can best integrate different learning and working styles into a cohesive organizational culture.

    This presentation explores the unique leadership and work styles of these generations. It addresses how to avoid pitfalls as well as how to capitalize on particular skill sets, leadership and work styles of the multigenerational work force prevalent in today's libraries. Recommendations for activities, teambuilding, and project management to capitalize on the strengths of all of your employees will be addressed.


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  1. Getting Started with Assessment: Using the Minute Paper to Find Trends in Student Learning
  2. Carrie Forbes, Instruction Coordinator and Reference Librarian
    University of Denver, Denver, CO

    This presentation will detail the results from minute paper assessments with writing classes at the University of Denver and give tips for using this effective technique.

    Click to view the abstract

    Outcomes-based assessment is a popular trend in library instruction, but many librarians are fearful of assessment and do not know how to get started. The minute paper provides an easy way to implement instructional assessment and discover trends in student learning. A one-minute paper assessment typically involves asking students to answer a couple of brief questions during the final minutes of a library instruction workshop. At the University of Denver's Penrose Library a minute paper assessment was used in all research workshops given to first-year writing classes during specific quarters in 2009 and 2010. Students in the writing classes were asked to respond to two simple questions on a SurveyMonkey survey: "What was the most important thing you learned in the library workshop?" and "What questions do you still have about library research?" Because the results were available online on SurveyMonkey, the reference librarians were able to view the comments from all their classes and note any common questions or concerns. In addition, some librarians met with classes multiple times, and by viewing the results of the assessment from the previous workshop were then able to address questions in future workshops. Since comments and questions were anonymous, answers to questions could also be posted online on the research guide for the writing class or on the library's frequently asked questions blog. Minute paper comments also provided the librarians with an opportunity to reflect on and improve their own teaching skills. Aggregate data from the assessments was used to identify trends in student learning outcomes and improve teaching for the following year. For example, by analyzing the trends in the types of questions and comments made by students, a more robust class research guide was developed with additional tutorials and handouts. Overall, the minute paper was relatively easy to administer, allowed students to anonymously give feedback or ask questions, and provided useful data on trends in student learning.


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  1. No Ballast to Throw Overboard: Restructuring an Already Lean Library for Hard Times
  2. Lisa Wiecki, Continuing Resources Librarian
    Lander University, Greenwood, SC

    Adam Haigh, Government Documents and Web Services Librarian
    Lander University, Greenwood, SC

    Mike Berry, Coordinator of Bibliographic Instruction and Reference
    Lander University, Greenwood, SC

    In a time of budget cuts, furloughs, and staff layoffs, librarians must advocate for their positions. This session will discuss how librarians at Lander University revised their job titles and duties under the leadership of a new Dean during a period of fiscal crisis. Learn how they went through this process to clarify their internal roles and market themselves to University administrators.

    Click to view the abstract

    In an effort to address immediate issues related to budget cuts and attrition due to the financial crisis at the end of 2008, Jackson Library at Lander University underwent a process of evaluation and revision of job titles and responsibilities of the remaining three librarians. What was a staff of five librarians and five paraprofessionals became a staff of three librarians, a dean, and three paraprofessionals. The intended result of the revision of titles and responsibilities was twofold. The first intention was to demonstrate on paper and to the university's administration that redundancy did not exist in the library. Rather than having three loosely defined "Reference Librarians" on an organization chart, we created three separate titles with separate, but at times overlapping, responsibilities to outline and clarify individual but necessary roles in the library. The second intention was to ensure that the work load was evenly divided and, at the same time, completed. The result has been that the library staff completes more work than before the reorganization, there is no appearance of redundancy, and staff roles and tasks are more personalized, allowing for continued development as professionals. This paper will discuss the months-long revision process, the decisions reached and why, and staff perceptions of the changes one year later.
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  1. Ne How, Hola, Welcome: Coordinating and Providing Meaningful Library Services to International Students
  2. Martha Allen, Reference Librarian
    Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO

    Saint Louis University has experienced a substantial increase in international student enrollment. The library partnered with a number of University entities to provide services tailored to meet the academic needs of this community of students. The presenter will discuss library successes and challenges as well as future programs and assessment initiatives.

    Click to view the abstract

    In the last two years, Saint Louis University has experienced a substantial increase in international student enrollment. To respond to the academic needs of the international students the library partnered with the ESL office, the Writing Center and other University entities to provide coordinated programs and services specifically tailored to this burgeoning community of students. Effective library initiatives include mapping the library instruction sessions to the ESL curriculum, informal brown-bag gatherings, individual reference sessions, and libguides tailored to specific assignments. Currently there are seven courses, three levels of reading classes and four levels of English classes, with six corresponding library instruction sessions. Using constructivist and interactive learning techniques, each library session builds on the one before highlighting skills matching the curriculum assignments. Library instruction successes and challenges as well as future programs and assessment initiatives will be discussed.
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  1. Access to Video Material in Academic Libraries

    Sandra Macke, Catalog Librarian
    University of Denver, Denver, CO

    Video material has become an integral part of a library's collection. This session will discuss trends on access to video material in academic libraries as well as a case study at one library.

    Click to view the abstract

    As video material becomes integrated into library teaching and patrons’ expectations of library material, academic libraries must decide on how to provide access to this important material. Individual libraries find themselves making decisions based on how the library can best serve their patrons. Library departments must collaborate and make policy decisions.

    This session will discuss trends on access to video material in academic libraries as well as a case study at one library. The session will cover subject/genre access points, classification, housing, location, and lending of video material. The focus is primarily on fiction and non-fiction DVDs. Additionally, the presentation covers access to video streaming material, historical VHS, and other video collections.


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  1. Reference E-Books: The Other Hidden Collection
  2. Sara E. Morris, American History Librarian
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

    Frances Devlin, Head of Libraries Research Services
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

    Judith Emde, E-Resources Technical Services Librarian
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

    Kathy Graves, Reference and Instruction Librarian
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

    As print reference collections are replaced with reference e-books, it has become more difficult for librarians and users to know what resources are available. At this session, learn about tips to increase visibility, awareness, discovery, and most importantly, use of these valuable resources. We hope you will share ideas from your libraries as well.

    Click to view the abstract

    Traditional print reference collections have been reduced significantly over the past few years, as the preference for and the availability of electronic resources have increased. Librarians at the University of Kansas are concerned that the growing numbers of reference e-books in the collection are underutilized. There is a clear need to promote these resources to both library reference staff and users who are unaware of the numerous reference titles purchased individually or contained in electronic packages, such as Credo Reference. Although records for individual titles, from online reference collections and those purchased separately, are loaded into the online catalog, there is currently no easy way to browse the electronic reference collection.
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  1. Copyright 0 to 60 in One Year
  2. Kati Donaghy, Technical Services Librarian
    Eureka College, Eureka, IL

    A micro-college's story of catching up on copyright compliance and embracing the application of Fair Use in the academic setting. How we created policy, informed the campus, and got started with e-reserves.

    Click to view the abstract

    In 2009, Eureka College's Melick Library set a goal to move away from physical course reserves shelved behind the circulation desk and into the twenty-first century by offering electronic reserves. As we explored our electronic reserve options we quickly became aware of a bigger issue on campus: the lack of any sort of institutional copyright policy or education. The librarians met this challenge by educating ourselves on current copyright/fair use practices and legislation and then crafting our own policies. With the support of our provost and campus administrators, the library began hosting workshops and presentations for faculty and staff informing them of the new policies, guidelines, and practices being created. With a copyright policy in place, we were then able to create and implement reserves and course-pack policies. We crafted reserve request and fair use compliance forms to establish documentation of the thoughtful application of fair use guidelines as well as securing permission to duplicate documents for educational use and distribution. The library's initiatives have prompted a campus-wide dialog on the importance of ethical education practices, the importance and draw-backs of copyright law, electronic access to course materials, and integrating course management software with our curriculum. A little over a year later, we find our education and implementation to be well accepted, respectfully debated, and has provided increased opportunities for the campus to recognize the essential functions of the library.
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  1. Getting Ready to Go Mobile: A Primer for the Uninitiated
  2. Rene Erlandson, Director, Virtual Services
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

    Rachel Erb, Systems Librarian
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

    It stands to reason if mobile technology is being used more, people are probably accessing your library's desktop Web site via mobile devices. Join us to find out how to track mobile usage of your desktop site, develop a mobile site and investigate mobile catalog interfaces for your library.

    Click to view the abstract

    Smartphone and 3G device ownership grew by 6% during 2009. Over 17% of mobile devices are now designed for web surfing. The increased interest in smartphones combined with the unlimited data plans offered by many providers/carriers is fueling a surge in mobile web use. How is the shift in mobile use affecting libraries? How can librarians find out if the traditional library desktop Web site is being accessed by patrons via mobile devices? What are the fundamentals of mobile Web site design? What services should libraries consider making available to their mobile users? What options are available for no-cost or low-cost library mobile catalog interfaces? Is there a way to achieve this aim despite the lack of technical expertise on staff?

    This workshop will provide specific, practical advice and strategies for developing a library Web site and catalog interface for your library. We will look at the free PercentMobile service and Google analytics as means for tracking mobile device traffic; examine basic design principles for mobile site development; and look at no-cost options for creating a mobile catalog interface for an Innovative Interfaces ILS and examine the low-cost Library Anywhere mobile catalog interface from LibraryThing.


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Sponsored by Owens Library , Northwest Missouri State University

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