2009 Sessions

  1. How Effective Is a One- Session Library Instruction? An Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes
  2. Ma Lei Hsieh, Assistant Professor 1 - Librarian
    Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ

    This study assesses the library instruction program for the information technology (IT) freshmen classes at Monmouth University. Pre-and post-tests and a student survey were installed in the course management system for assessment. The researcher also proposes strategies to improve library instruction by taking the Millennials' learning styles into consideration.

    Click to view the abstract

    Most college libraries offer one-session library instruction tailored to class assignments. Monmouth University librarians aimed to determine if one-session library instruction is effective for building information literacy (IL) skills for students. The study assessed the library instruction program for the information technology (IT) freshmen classes over the course of three semesters. Two instruments were installed in the course management system for the assessment: pre-and post-tests and a student survey. The instruments were administered by the class faculty to monitor the learning progress of students and to rate the effectiveness of the library session.

    The difference between the pre- and post test scores was statistically significant, suggesting that one-session library instruction model was effective for student learning. In the survey portion, most students rated the library session highly, confirming the value of the library instruction. The results of the tests indicated that students needed the reinforcement on the use of library catalog and research databases. Furthermore, teaching faculty made a significant difference in student learning when they reinforced the IL concepts in the classroom.

    In conclusion, while one session library instruction is useful, many changes can still be made to improve student learning. The learning styles of the Millennials are taken into consideration as the researcher proposes strategies to improve library instruction.
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  1. Turning your Virtual Reference Service into the Kind of First-Class Service that Users Expect and Deserve
  2. William Breitbach, Senior Assistant Librarian
    California State University, Fullerton, CA

    Mike DeMars, Senior Assistant Librarian
    California State University, Fullerton, CA

    In the session, participants will learn how they can effectively communicate online and maintain the "human" dimension of reference services in the virtual environment, shorten transaction times by using simple and free technologies, and solve some of those persistent technological problems encountered in virtual reference service.

    Click to view the abstract

    After more than a decade of virtual reference services, a variety of problems persist: absence of a reference interview, communication limitations, extended transaction times, concerns about the quality of instruction, and technological problems. This session will briefly go over problems identified in the literature and recommend free and/or low cost solutions to solve these problems. In the session, participants will learn how they can effectively communicate online and maintain the "human" dimension of reference services in the virtual environment, shorten transaction times by using simple-to-use and free technology, and solve some of those persistent technological problems encountered in virtual reference service. Making small changes in the way we do virtual reference can ensure we provide the first-class service that users expect and deserve.
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  1. The Process and Promise of Consolidating Public Service Desks: You Can't Hurry Love
  2. Phillip J. Jones, Interim Head of the Fine Arts Library
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

    Tim Zou, Head of Access Services
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR

    The University of Arkansas Libraries embarked upon a major consolidation of public service in the main library, which led to the union of circulation and reference services at one desk in 2008. This session is geared toward attendees exploring the reconfiguration of the service points of their libraries.

    Click to view the abstract

    Professional literature and anecdotal evidence from presentations at conferences indicate that the consolidation of public service, common in branch libraries and other small academic libraries, is being debated and implemented in some central libraries of larger institutions. The personnel of the University of Arkansas Libraries analyzed this emerging trend in 2008 while addressing new strategic goals. A task force of twelve supervisors ultimately recommended a centralized one-stop service desk in the main library, Mullins. Several major considerations guided the project: streamlining service to avoid the confusion of patrons and the ping-pong effect of referrals among multiple service points, and staffing personnel in a cost-effective manner. Open-minded and thorough brainstorming was critical to the task force's success. This paper discusses the rationale for the changes, explains the process of striving to build consensus across all functions within the Public Services Division, presents factors that led to the decision to relocate reference service to the circulation desk, and reviews the implementation in December 2008 and initial results.

    The consolidation of service desks at the University of Arkansas Libraries represents a fairly rare-or at least rarely reported-approach among medium and larger central academic libraries: the merger of circulation and reference at one desk. Initial results have been mixed. Consolidation of several functions within Access Services has allowed Mullins Library to be open extended hours throughout the semester and around the clock on weekdays (24/5) during the finals period. However, to many members of the Reference Department, the elision of the reference desk has been portentous and not decreased their front-line duties to date. Although the consolidation of circulation and reference has some features of an arranged marriage, there remains time to develop a healthy relationship through increased training and a better appreciation of the functions of each partner. The authors, the head of Access Services and the former head of Reference, share their experiences of co-chairing the project, their strategies for its success, and their unique perspectives on this unusual union and its applicability to other academic libraries considering a more literal approach to "one-stop shopping."

    The consolidation of the public desks of the University of Arkansas Libraries does not represent a final product, but the beginning of an ongoing process of reconfiguring services to meet perceived expectations of library service and broader institutional objectives within an increasingly tight budget. The Mullins experience illustrates that the profession must take calculated risks in a difficult fiscal climate to serve a diverse clientele in a relevant, efficient manner.
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  1. How Can Cataloging and Catalogs Evolve and Respond to Expanded User Expectations?
  2. Lynnette Fields, Catalog and Metadata Librarian
    Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL

    In this session we will examine what academic library users want in an online catalog, "Next Generation Catalogs" and how cataloging is evolving to meet increased user expectations.

    Click to view the abstract

    The world of information is changing at an unprecedented rate. Studies show that the 21st century "information consumer" wants self-sufficiency, satisfaction, and seamlessness. People of all ages are spending more time online doing things for themselves that used to be done for them, e.g., online banking, Expedia for travel arrangements, online shopping, etc. Most users are happy with the information they find on the Internet on their own, and many of them don't realize they might be missing out on valuable information, or the information they found may not be credible. Today's college students grew up with computers, and they don't view them as technology, they instead view them as a way of life. They expect a seamless world and want to be able to do everything on a single computer. Many libraries are the opposite of this seamless world, with banks of computers designated for discrete functions. The bottom line is that our users want information now, all in one place, and they don't want to have to go to the library to get it.

    This session will focus on how "Next Generation Catalogs" are beginning to address some of these issues. We will look at some examples of "Next Generation Catalogs" that are currently being used in academic libraries, and the eXtensible Catalog, being developed by the University of Rochester. The eXtensible Catalog features a suite of open-source applications and will run along-side a library's integrated library system (ILS) to allow seamless connections to other web applications. Many people feel this is the library catalog of the future, and should provide the "one-stop" shopping our users are looking for.

    But one thing that we have to remember is that proper functionality in any library catalog comes down to the metadata underneath. We will take a look at RDA (Resource Description and Access) the new cataloging standard that is currently being developed. RDA is a &principle based& cataloging standard and will be able to be encoded in MARC, Dublin Core, or other metadata schema. We will also examine FRBR (Functional Requirement of Bibliographic Records), the conceptual framework behind RDA.

    We will close the session with an examination of what catalogers can do to ensure that library catalogs remain relevant to our users.
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  1. Build an iLibrary with iGoogle: Building Blocks for Libraries
  2. Rene Erlandson, Director, Virtual Services
    University of Nebraska-Omaha, NE

    Rachel Erb, Virtual Services/Systems Librarian
    University of Nebraska-Omaha, NE

    How can you harness the power of an Internet giant who plays host to almost 22,000,000 visitors a month? Plug-in to iGoogle. Allow patrons to customize interaction with library resources by utilizing iGoogle sandbox tools to develop library Web applications and incorporate other Google features into their information experience.

    Click to view the abstract

    In January 2008, iGoogle held over 26% of the personalized homepage market share, averaging almost 22,000,000 visitors a month. iGoogle's drag and drop interface allows users to create customized virtual spaces by adding iGoogle gadgets, GMail, Google Notebook, Google Talk and a plethora of other features to their personal home pages. Libraries are in the unique position to capitalize on the Internet giant's advance into customizable virtual spaces and the OpenSocial venue.

    In an effort to increase the number of visitors using iGoogle as their personal virtual environments, Google created iGoogle sandbox for developers, which allows third party developers to create Web applications for public and personal use within iGoogle. Libraries can capitalize on Google's commitment to personal virtual space development, by utilizing the sandbox tools and documentation provided by the Internet giant to create a myriad of Web applications. Library staff with minimal understanding of Web development will be able to create Web-applications for searching library resources like the catalog, journal lists and databases, as well as Web-applications that incorporate and create RSS feeds and blogs into users' personalized home pages.

    iGoogle allows visitors to include Gmail, Google Talk and Google Friend Connect in their personal homepages. Via Google talk libraries can connect with users in their iGoogle pages to provide IM reference assistance. Libraries can catch the wave of OpenSocial, by incorporating Google Friend Connect into library Web sites, blogs and mash-ups. Users will be able to actively engage with library content, posting comments and reviews. Library users will also be able to connect with friends on other networks like Facebook and MySpace via the Google Friend Connect feature to discuss issues and exchange ideas.

    This presentation will demonstrate how iGoogle can provide your library with almost limitless possibilities for connecting with and serving communities.
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  1. Evaluating CamStudio and Wink Screen Capture Programs for Library Instruction
  2. Ted Gentle, Reference and Instruction Librarian
    Emporia State University, Emporia, KS

    To explain the various features of electronic databases, library Web sites, and online resources to their patrons, academic librarians are increasingly using screen capture programs to create presentations. These programs range from free software such as CamStudio, Jing, and Wink to commercial software such as Adobe Captivate and Camtasia. With the goal of aiding budget-conscious academic librarians, this presentation will compare and evaluate the freely available CamStudio and Wink programs.

    Click to view the abstract

    To explain the various features of electronic databases, library Web sites, and online resources to their patrons, academic librarians are increasingly using screen capture programs to create presentations. These programs range from free software such as CamStudio, Jing, and Wink to commercial software such as Adobe Captivate and Camtasia. Though these commercial products are "widely used" for presentations, their full versions cost hundreds of dollars (Clark 75). With the goal of aiding budget-conscious academic librarians, this presentation will compare and evaluate the freely available CamStudio and Wink programs. In addition to offering audio soundtracks for the video, these programs provide the option for text captions and therefore meet criteria for Americans with Disabilities Act compliancy. Their video presentations consist of a series of captured frames of video activity, which allow for greater detail, efficiency, and ease of editing. Though frames result in larger file sizes in the case of lengthy presentations, both programs also allow for the compression of such files. This allows even lengthier presentations to be placed onto multimedia Web sites for easy access. Both programs employ hotkey combinations to control the recording process and allow for sections of the screen or the entire screen to be captured. Text captions and other illustrative shapes are customizable and may be edited, resized, or made transparent.

    CamStudio and Wink also have important differences that will be discussed and evaluated. CamStudio is able to convert AVI files to Flash files ("RenderSoft CamStudio" 29-30), allows the user to automatically pan the capture region using the cursor ("CamStudio" 14), and accommodates additional video content from a webcam ("CamStudio" 25-27). However, it also requires third party video editing ("CamStudio" 3) and only allows text annotations during rather than after the recording process ("CamStudio" 24-25). Wink translates text into different languages (Madsen, Worthington, and Kumar 5), allows for the editing of its own frames (Madsen, Worthington, and Kumar 16-26), and more conveniently supports text annotations and interactive buttons (Madsen, Worthington, and Kumar 18-23) during this editing process. However, Wink only provides video content in Flash format (Madsen, Worthington, and Kumar 4) and offers no webcam functionality. In outlining the respective strengths and weaknesses of these programs, this presentation will enable librarians to identify which program best meets the needs of their library.

    Clark, John D. "Captivate [and] Camtasia." Journal of the Medical Library Association. 96 (2008): 75-8.

    Madsen, Bent Moller, Linda Worthington, and Satish Kumar. 2.0 User Guide. 2006. Text file.

    "RenderSoft CamStudio." CamStudio - Free Screen Recording Software. 2 Mar. 2009. Adobe Systems Incorporated. 6 Feb. 2009. <http://camstudio.org/>.
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  1. Physical Space in a Virtual World: Implications for Library Space
  2. David Alexander, Digital Access Manager
    The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD

    The design and use of physical space is an important issue for libraries, be they virtual or real world. This session will consider representation of physical space in Second Life libraries and discuss how Second Life can be used as a cost effective tool in designing real world library spaces.

    Click to view the abstract

    The design and use of physical space is an important issue for libraries whether they are located in a virtual world or the real world. For virtual world libraries the major question is to what extent should the library mirror its real world counter-part, if at all. The current state of library "physical presence" in the Virtual World Second Life will be considered and what factors may be influencing the design decisions will be discussed. Second Life can also be used by real world libraries for a cost-efficient tool for developing library building designs for new libraries or remodeling projects. How to get the most out of the design process will be considered.
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  1. "Can You Hear Me Now?" Student Employees and Communication Strategies
  2. Crystal M. Rader, Student Supervisor, Circulation Department
    College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

    "Can you hear me now?" During this session we will review the most effective practices for communicating with our library student employees. Our emphasis will be on positive communications as well as student training and development.

    Click to view the abstract

    Imagine this: you are the supervisor for twenty plus student employees whose priorities are anything other than work. Is it your responsibility as the student supervisor to manage your employees' academic and extracurricular schedules? No. But as supervisors of student employees we do have to think about balancing student needs with the needs of the library.

    This session will analyze student employee management through the use of up-to-date communication strategies. We will think outside the box and approach employee-supervisor communications from the student perspective. How do we communicate effectively with people 10, 20, 30 years younger than we and who seem to be speaking a different language? You've probably heard of Facebook and My Space, but have you considered using them for work?

    The College of William & Mary's Earl Gregg Swem Library employs a tiered student population ranging from shelvers to students with higher-level staff responsibilities. Different communication strategies are needed to communicate effectively with students at varying levels of experience and training. We must be flexible in our approaches to student employees, but we must also adapt to changing norms of communication.

    Implementing effective communication strategies will not guarantee that our student employees will give us everything we want from them. During this session, we will also address student employee development as a necessary step in securing reliable employees.

    To ensure students are working for the library, and not just for a paycheck, we must invest in our students. As the College of William & Mary's Human Resources department has questioned its practices in regards to staff and faculty, the library staff has questioned whether we are doing enough for our students. Do your student employees have any opportunity for advancement, or to serve on a library committee? Investing in the training and development of student employees demonstrates a commitment to the student. Wouldn't you rather commit to something that is just as invested in you?
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  1. A Virtual Librarian in Any Class
  2. Laura M. Wight, Associate Professor/ Information Literacy Librarian
    South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD

    Elizabeth Fox, Professor/Digital Information Librarian
    South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD

    Librarians should be a click away from any course - traditional, hybrid, or online. Learn how to implement a variety of virtual library information services including: Meebo chat widgets on web pages (including courseware such as D2L/Blackboard); Facebook chat; learning modules; course-specific library web guides; and distance library instruction using web conferencing.

    Click to view the abstract

    Librarians from South Dakota State University (SDSU) share ways in which they are collaborating with non-library faculty to provide information literacy instruction and other information services to traditional, hybrid, and online campus classes. These services include: Meebo chat widgets on library and course web pages; Facebook chat; learning modules/tutorials; course-specific library web guides; and distance library instruction using web conferencing.

    "Ask a Librarian" chat services have been very popular with students and faculty requiring research assistance at SDSU. Meebo chat widgets can be integrated into any library or course web page, including pages in courseware systems such as D2L and Blackboard. This enables live communication with a librarian any time the librarian is physically available at the information desk, or during office hours. In addition, library faculty use Facebook's internal mail and chat features to respond to patron inquiries during office hours.

    Librarians use Camtasia and narrated PowerPoint presentations to create short one to five minute tutorials and learning modules demonstrating search strategies relevant across the curriculum. In addition, the instruction librarians collaborate with teaching faculty to create tutorials relevant to the specific research needs of a particular course. Pre-packaged learning modules (such as the Copyright Learning Module) can be shared and loaded into any course available on the university courseware system. These tutorials and learning modules allow librarians to provide focused research assistance where it is most needed, and to meet the demand of faculty teaching online courses.

    Online library instruction via web-conferencing, and course-specific library research guides are another example of how librarians can "package" tailored library research materials and make them available to students enrolled in a particular traditional, hybrid, or online course. Librarians at SDSU teach distance library instruction online using Elluminate web-conferencing software. This allows students enrolled in distance or online-only classes to experience an introduction to library research similar to those of their peers enrolled in on-campus courses. In addition, course-specific library research guides designed according to the specifications of the course instructor are an excellent sustained online supplement to distance library instruction. Course-specific library research guides are promoted during traditional and online library instruction.
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  1. Serials Evaluation Process Improvements: Advanced Excel "Magic"
  2. Kathy Ferguson, Electronic Serials Specialist
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Lisa Jennings, Acquisitions Manager
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Sara Duff, Coordinator of Technical Services
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Carolyn Johnson, Information Librarian
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    A team from Northwest Missouri State University presents advanced Excel tools and techniques that will help you transform your yearly serials evaluation process from a headache and hassle to a streamlined, smooth, data driven procedure. They demonstrate advanced Excel features that can be applied to collection management decisions.

    Click to view the abstract

    For the past decade, the Collection Management Team at Northwest Missouri State University has been transferring serials holdings from print to full-text online due to yearly periodical subscription increases and user preference for online access. They have employed a variety of methods to objectively evaluate serials titles. The evolution of these methods is briefly covered in the presentation. The following advanced Excel features are demonstrated in relation to serials data; IF and nested IF statement, conditional formatting, hide/unhide, filtering, hyperlinking, and data validation. For example, IF and nested IF statements are used for cost per use by format, conditional formatting eases identification of titles under consideration, These features are applicable to any academic library for collection management decision making about serials and student, faculty, and staff needs and preferences.
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  1. Collection Development in Tight Economic Times: A Homegrown Workflow Analysis Program
  2. Anna Hulseberg, Academic Librarian
    Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN

    Julie Gilbert, Academic Librarian
    Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN

    Looking to collaborate on a weeding project? Need to shape your collection during tight economic times? This session outlines a homegrown workflow analysis program designed to empower library personnel to assess relevant collection data in order to create the best possible collection for users.

    Click to view the abstract

    Collection development decision making requires accurate and clearly presented information about a library's holdings. Today's tight economic constraints necessitate libraries making use of resources in order to shape collections that best meet the needs of users. Relevant data are often difficult to compile due to factors such as the limits of integrated library systems (ILS), database-generated statistics, and overlapping, sometimes diverging, approaches among staff toward collection development.

    How can collection management and electronic resources specialists best collaborate to support a collection development program that encompasses books and serials in a variety of formats, especially when those formats are evolving continuously? How can they support decision-making that involves faculty members who may be unfamiliar with library terminology, tools, and concerns such as access and licensing? What opportunities does a collegial management model offer for library staff to collaborate on collection development workflow analysis across the boundaries of traditional roles? With these questions in mind, librarians at Gustavus Adolphus College facilitated parallel workflow analyses of collection development and electronic resources management tasks and applied recommendations to a book weeding project and an electronic resources review. These efforts, conducted as a pilot program for future workflow analyses, emphasize generating information and forging new collaborative relationships to support collection development decisions. Initial findings from the book weeding project indicate a need to better utilize the ILS in order to gain a more comprehensive view of the collection. Initial findings from the electronic resources review indicate a need for a more centralized and efficient system for gathering, organizing, and analyzing electronic resources information, particularly usage statistics. The pilot program also maps an approach that requires no outside funding and can be adapted to analyze other workflow issues.

    This session tracks the projects, provides assessment data, and presents outcomes such as new policies, procedures, and tools for providing information to inform collection development decisions. The session also highlights new opportunities for collaboration among collection management and electronic resources staff.
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  1. Creating Usability Tests that Work for your Web site and other Web Applications
  2. Kari D. Weaver, Information Literacy Librarian
    Wartburg College, Waverly, IA

    Kimberly Babcock Mashek, Information Literacy Librarian
    Wartburg College, Waverly, IA

    Usability testing of Web sites is used to understand how patrons use the library's online presence. Through this presentation, participants will learn how to create and plan usability tests for their Web sites which can be retooled for other web applications such as electronic user guides and online tutorials.

    Click to view the abstract

    Library Web sites are an extension of our physical presence. While librarians know how their patrons use the library based on everyday experiences, determining how patrons use the library online may be elusive. Usability testing provides a framework for investigating the interaction of your online constituency. This presentation will discuss how to create simple and effective usability tests for the library Web site and how to extend these techniques for testing of other applications such as Springshare LibGuides and tutorials created using Adobe Captivate. Usability testing web applications provides valuable insight when considering productivity and employee resources devoted to these tools. Discussion will include tips on generating good questions and tasks ultimately resulting in thoughtful responses, techniques to encourage participation, and the implications of this information for design.
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  1. 11,000,000 Words: An Avalanche of Academic Archive Photos at K-State at Salina
  2. Heidi Blackburn, Reference and Instruction Librarian
    Kansas State University, Salina, KS

    Pam Bower, Library Assistant
    Kansas State University, Salina, KS

    Alysia Starkey, Library Director
    Kansas State University, Salina, KS

    Do you have a hard time putting your personal photos into albums? Imagine trying to accomplish that task with 11,000 photos! The K-State at Salina librarians have been working very hard to manage an overwhelming photographic archive collection that was, until recently, stored in 11 unlabeled boxes.

    Click to view the abstract

    Institutional archives have always provided a sense of history and unity for most universities. This is especially emphasized for the K-State at Salina photographic collection. The school has gone through four different name changes in the last fifty years and the library has amassed an overwhelming assortment of photographs documenting various events on campus, from groundbreaking ceremonies to student social occasions. With an estimated total of over 11,000 unlabeled photographs, the K-State at Salina librarians have worked hard to begin the process of providing the university community with a useful resource for historical research in the future. Using a variety of methods, both digital and face-to-face, to identify the photos' events and participants, the librarians have sorted a small portion of the photographs thus far and plan to create a finding aid in the future. Come learn about this unique project if your own archives project has been on the back burner and you're looking for some tips on how (and how not!) to get started.
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  1. Are You Ready for "the Cloud"? Implications and Uses of Cloud Computing for Libraries
  2. Alyssa Martin, Reference Librarian
    Troy University, Montgomery, AL

    Kent Snowden, Director
    Troy University, Montgomery, AL

    Debbie West, Collection Development Librarian
    Troy University, Montgomery, AL

    Cloud computing is the new buzzword in education. Cloud computing refers to applications that are hosted on the Internet "cloud." Librarians will give a brief demonstration of web-based cloud computing applications (i.e. Google Apps) and discuss the pros and cons of cloud computing along with future implications and uses for libraries.

    Click to view the abstract

    Are you, and your library, ready for "the cloud"? Cloud computing is the new buzzword in education. Many people are moving from office applications on their own computers, to free or low-cost collaborative applications on the Internet "cloud." Librarians will discuss implications and uses of cloud computing for libraries. This presentation will be beneficial to anyone who is interested in exploring ways new technology such as cloud computing can be used to collaborate with other librarians, faculty and staff and enhance library users' information seeking experiences.

    During this presentation, librarians will give a brief demonstration of some web-based cloud computing applications (i.e. Google Apps) and share their experiences using these applications. They will discuss the pros and cons of cloud computing, along with implications and uses for libraries. Librarians will talk about the benefits of cloud computing including mobility, flexibility, universal access and the fact that it can save time, money and resources. The cons of cloud computing will also be examined, including privacy and security issues. Attendees will be encouraged to brainstorm ways that cloud computing can be used in their libraries to collaborate with students, faculty and staff for a variety of purposes such as instruction, research, reference, etc.
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  1. Lightning Round


    • Using Jing to Turn your IM or Chat Reference into a Multimedia Educational Experience
    • William Breitbach, Librarian
      California State University, Fullerton, CA

      In this session, participants will learn how to turn their reference service into a multimedia educational experience. Virtual reference services no longer need to be solely text-based. They can be enhanced with customized videos made on-the-fly that provide great opportunities for instruction online.

      Click to view the abstract

      Many librarians have expressed concern about the one-dimensional aspect of instant messenger (IM) and chat services. Virtual reference services no longer need to be solely text-based. Instead, they can be turned into multimedia educational experiences using customized videos made on-the-fly. These videos can replicate what we show patrons in-person at the reference desk and include both visual and audio instructions. The videos can be created quicker than typing instructions into a chat box - saving the librarian from excessive typing and showing the patron exactly what you want them to see. The great potential for this kind of service is its customization and personalization - the two factors that have made in-person reference so successful. Perhaps most importantly, these custom-made videos provide librarians the opportunity to employ instruction strategies such as meta-cognitive modeling and other teaching methods that are difficult to employ using text communication alone.
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    • Empower College Students' Research Skills via Digital Media
    • Elaine Chen, Instructional Design Specialist
      University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA

      Come to learn how we utilize digital media to provide virtual services for students who don't usually come to the library for research help. The design and development process for producing low-cost projects will be shared. An example of each type of digital media project will be provided.

      Click to view the abstract

      As the face of education and the idea of the university library are changing, getting students to ask for research help is a higher education challenge. Obviously, learning is not the same for the digital natives compared to our perceptions about learning. Use traditional methods such as lectures or handouts in delivering research strategies could no longer meet the digital learners' need. University libraries must embrace technology-based learning styles and create a familiar Web environment where virtual research tips are provided for students to learn at their own pace.

      Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell articulate media as "means of communication" that carry information between "a source and a receiver" with a purpose to facilitate communication and learning (6). Among different types of media (text, audio, visuals, video, objects, and people), digital media are "digital, often having characteristics of being manipulability, networkable, dense, compressible, and impartial" ("Digital Media"). Briggs suggests digital media as the content and services delivered over digital channels such as the Internet. While watched, the content and services can be connected (streaming/live) or unconnected (downloads/DVD).

      Several universities have been setting up channels on YouTube since October 2008. The video collection is not only distributing educational content, but also "selling" the university to the outer world. For example, being the first to launch YouTube, University of California-Berkeley offers a series of university courses for free. UChannel by Princeton University provides a collection of international and political affairs videos. MIT provides a new collection of classroom lectures. Some university professors also use YouTube to extend their classroom, a well-known example is Dr. Michael L. Wesch, an assistant professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University, who made the video "Web 2.0: The Machine is Us/ing Us" and drew more than 400,000 views. Unquestionably, "Web video offers a new way for scholars to communicate" (Young).

      In spring 2007, a multimedia production team was established at the University of Northern Iowa Library. The team's primary goal is to produce a series of ongoing podcasts, YouTube videos, and Flash-based tutorials for virtual services. While the ultimate goal for these projects is to empower college students' research skills, these digital media projects are designed into small modules with clear purposes to meet the needs of diverse students. For example, for college freshmen, a series of "quick tips" such as how to use online databases, electronic newspaper resources, and how to schedule a research consultation were developed. For international students, tips for how to check out books, study rooms, DVDs, laptops, and lockers were created. For specific research tools such as how to use the print-based Social Science Citation Index and the library's meta-search engine, a series of Flash-based tutorials were produced. After the production, the videos were then announced on the University's online newspaper, the library's news blog, and the library's print newsletter.

      In this session, the presenter will share the design and development process for producing low-cost digital media projects.
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    • Extend Student Learning after Class: Moodle and Library Instruction
    • Lauren Jensen, Public Services Librarian
      Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL

      Is your library looking for a way to encourage learning after instruction sessions? Moodle is one way to extend the instruction experience outside the classroom. Learn how librarians can easily create supplementary documents, quizzes, glossaries, and polls relating to coursework in an environment students already use with other classes.

      Click to view the abstract

      To promote learning outside of the classroom and supplement traditional learning models, many institutions are looking to Course Management Systems (CMS), like Moodle, to enhance student learning. This presentation will discuss how libraries can use this technology too - to complement library instruction sessions and create a library presence in the online academic community.

      Moodle is easy to use and librarians can quickly create material to correspond to a particular instruction session or to provide information relating to the library in general. Moodle's built in features allow for the development of course documents, quizzes, discussion forums, polls, glossaries, and more. With some imagination, librarians can use these features to construct and manage dynamic resource guides, answer students' questions, post lesson summaries and handouts, and provide documentation for material that may or may not have been covered in class. Students have the opportunity to contribute as well, by populating glossaries and participating in online discussions. In addition to complementing instruction sessions, Moodle's calendar and news forum features offer information about the library. Librarians can populate the module with basic How do I? help sections, database guidance, and staff contact information that is accessible to students even when a library staff member may not be. For instructors, Moodle also provides usage statistics by section which facilitates assessment of particular features and resources. Overall, it is a user friendly platform that provides a means to strengthen and reinforce the library instruction experience in an online environment students already visit because of other coursework.
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    • Meebo: Jumpstarting an Instant Message Reference Program
    • Jennifer Nelson, Electronic Resources/Technical Services Librarian
      Morningside College, Sioux City, IA

      The Hickman Johnson Furrow Learning Center has offered instant message reference service since 2005. The library initially had accounts with MSN, AIM and Yahoo, but by 2008, the MSN account was the only one used. During the first days of 2009, they added a Meebo widget to the library site in hopes of jumpstarting instant message reference.

      Click to view the abstract

      Like many academic libraries, the Hickman Johnson Furrow Learning Center at Morningside College has had trouble convincing students to use the library as a physical space. In an effort to reach out to students who were less than enthusiastic about entering the library for reference help, in 2005, the library rolled out instant message reference through MSN, AIM and Yahoo. By 2008, due to lack of use from users with Yahoo and AIM, the service had been scaled back to MSN only. In early 2009, hoping to increase the number of online reference interactions, a Meebo instant message widget was installed on the library Web site. Among the many reasons for this move was hopes that the library Web site would become more heavily trafficked, providing a way for students to ask potentially sensitive questions anonymously, and to stop forcing students to download a specific instant message client (particularly non-traditional students).

      What are the benefits to instant message reference service? Do libraries actually accomplish anything by reaching out to students via instant message services? What are the benefits to using a web-based widget rather than specific instant message clients? What are some creative ways of implementing instant message reference? These questions will all be briefly touched up in this presentation along with the results of Morningside College's experimentation with web-based widget instant message reference.
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  1. Taking the Library Where Our Users Are (Where Is That, Exactly?)
  2. Julia Bauder, Data Services Librarian
    Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA

    Most librarians today recognize the need to "be where our users are"--that is, to integrate library services into users' preferred online environments. But what are our users' preferred online environments? This session attempts to answer that question through a study of students' and faculty members' research workflows.

    Click to view the abstract

    Most librarians today recognize the need to "be where our users are"--that is, to integrate library services into users' preferred online environments. Libraries are on Facebook and Flickr; they blog and tweet; and some of them even contribute to Wikipedia. But how do we know that our users are actually in these places? Even if we think we know where our users go when they are online, do we know how these Web sites and services fit into their academic lives?

    I attempt to answer these questions through a study of which Web resources students and faculty use and how they incorporate these sites into their academic workflows. Knowing where students and faculty go online, and what they do when they get there, allows librarians to better prioritize our online outreach efforts. This makes it more likely that we can succeed not only in "being where our users are," but, more importantly, in being in the places where we will be most useful to our students and faculty.
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  1. How to be the Bad Guy without Being Bad: Strategies for Getting Your Staff Back on Track
  2. Mary Carmen Chimato, Head, Access & Delivery Services
    North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

    As managers and supervisors we all have dealt with employees who were not working up to their potential or performance expectations. This session will present strategies for coaching, conducting effective performance improvement discussions and building personal responsibility for performance.

    Click to view the abstract

    As managers and supervisors we all have dealt with employees who were not working up to their potential or performance expectations. While most people respond positively to coaching and constructive criticism, there are those who continue to perform below expectations and allow their performance issues to become behavioral problems, or worse to affect their colleagues in the organization. As managers, we are expected to be leaders and motivators, as well as the person who doles out punishment when there is a problem. Consequently, dealing with these types of problems is often uncomfortable and can be inconsistent.

    This session will present strategies for coaching, conducting effective performance improvement discussions, and building personal responsibility for performance shifting it from the manager to the employee. The session will also cover common types of performance issues, and how to reinforce and recognize good performance.
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  1. Expanding while Simplifying: Document Delivery Services at the University of Wyoming Libraries
  2. William O. Van Arsdale, III, Head, Access Services
    University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY

    Request It is a comprehensive document delivery service that grafts book paging and scanning of journal articles from local collections onto traditional interlibrary loan. Built around ILLiad, the Libraries have simplified log-on procedures, pull citations (including OPAC citations) in through OpenURL, eliminated charges for UW patrons, distributed work to library branches, and integrated RAPIDill so that UW patrons merely have to request materials and we supply them.

    Click to view the abstract

    Faced with a renovation and addition to the UW Coe Library, the Science Library was closed for renovation and conversion to a storage facility, the Library Annex. New services were implemented to delivery documents while the compact shelving was installed: the Voyager Call Slip module was used to page "Science" books and bring them to the main library for pickup and a web form allowed user to request periodicals to be scanned which were delivered via email. These services were reasonably successful, but there was some patron confusion as to when to use specific request channels. As we re-opened the Annex and prepared to start moving older bound periodical volumes to this facility we decided to expand these services to all campus libraries and, at the same time, to simplify the way patrons placed requests. We installed an ILLiad client at the Annex to save running staff over to scan interlibrary loan requests and realized the OCLC product would be a good platform to replace the previous web form and had other benefits such as enabling OpenURL transfers of bibliographic citations from databases and tracking of requests by patrons. Library Systems staff programmed a way to scrape bibliographic data from online catalog records and bring them into ILLiad through OpenURL. Recognizing that the resulting service was both intra-library and interlibrary loan, we rebranded the service as "Request It." There was virtually no concerns within the Libraries about offering such services and breaking with long-standing library practice that if an item were available on open shelving patrons were responsible for locating it themselves. Long-term library users are pleased with the new service and millennial students tend to react that this is not novel, it is the way things should have always been.

    The Libraries Access Services and Systems departments continue to explore ways improve delivery speed and make things easier for our users. The Libraries van run was expanded to twice a day. ILLiad clients were installed at other branch libraries so paging and scanning could be done where the material was. Request It (ILLiad) was switched to LDAP authentication so patrons had one less username/password combination to remember. Library administration reviewed interlibrary loan subsidies and decided that all charges would be borne by the Libraries. Subsequently we implemented OCLC's trusted sender feature and edged into the buy-not-borrow practice. We have implemented Colorado State's RAPIDill system as a major Request It component and look forward to when it will be fully integrated into ILLiad. The replacement of our ILS offers new challenges and new opportunities for document delivery. We still have a way to go to connect Request It to our regional end-user request service, Prospector.
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  1. What We Do for the Sake of Correct Citations
  2. Connie Jo Ury, Assistant Professor
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    Patricia Wyatt, Reference Specialist
    Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO

    The presenters surveyed public and private undergraduate libraries in an eight state region regarding the type of citation reference services and instruction they provide. They will share an overview of common practices and unique models. Inclusion of audience experiences with citation services and instruction will enhance the session.

    Click to view the abstract

    While one might expect that the quality of students' citations of sources has improved due to the many citation help screens and citations for articles currently available in databases, librarians often caution students to check the integrity of these citations against style manuals or library provided style sheets. Kessler and Van Ullen, librarians at the University of Albany, found that more than 90% of the citation examples provided by major databases included errors. Coupling this problem with the wide array of citation styles included on Web pages and listed as "Cite this Source," professors are bemoaning the quality of students' reference lists and in-text references. Many times they return students' papers, instructing them to "clean-up" their citations. Students, unaware of where they have gone awry, show up at the reference desk asking for help.

    Librarians, as colleagues with classroom faculty, have long been considered the authorities on citation form and style. Students and faculty alike turn to librarians for advice about citing unusual sources. With the advent of electronic sources, very few student papers incorporate solely traditional print sources. The evolving landscape of electronic mediums requires that citation styles be constantly reinterpreted and adapted to accommodate new types of sources. Librarians are often the first ones to be asked to interpret how to cite these unforeseen changes in information styles. As a result, we find ourselves creating citation guides and instructional tools to help students and faculty cite new types of sources.

    Intrigued by the wide variety of instructional styles and online resources librarians are creating to assist students and faculty in citing sources that they learned about in conversations at conferences and encountered on the Web, the presenters surveyed public and private undergraduate four year university and college libraries in an eight state region regarding the type of citation reference services and instruction they provide. They chose to confine their research to a regional area in order to obtain a large enough sample to validate their research, while not creating such a large sample that collating the information was untenable.

    This presentation will include an overview of common practices and unique models gleaned from the surveys collected. Information gleaned from the survey will include:

    • Service and instructional trends.
    • Online resources created by librarians.
    • Anecdotal information about successful services which help students produce accurate bibliographies.

    Time for inclusion of audience experiences with citation services and instruction will enhance the session.

    Kessler, Jane and Mary K. Van Ullen. "Citation Help in Databases: Helpful or Harmful." Public Services Quarterly 2.1 (2006): 21-42. Education Research Complete. EBSCOhost. Owens Lib., Maryville, MO. 26 Jan. 2009.
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  1. Lightning Round


    • Mixing It Up: Finding New Ways to Promote Library Services and Resources
    • Mindy Cooper, Visiting Assistant Librarian
      IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN

      University Library at IUPUI (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis) has experimented with video, Flickr, and social networking utilities MySpace and Facebook to alert students to the services and resources that we have to offer.

      Click to view the abstract

      In 2007, librarians at IUPUI University Library began work on finding new ways to promote our library's resources and services to students. We developed a video that was shown during new student orientation, linked to our homepage and posted on YouTube. Since we found that a great number of our students use library computers to access their MySpace and Facebook accounts, we developed a presence in both of these social networking utilities. Additionally, we use our Facebook account to advertise our Undergraduate Diversity Fellowship. Librarians have used photo albums created using Flickr to give students a "virtual tour" when it was not possible to bring the students to the library for instruction. In this lightning round presentation, Mindy Cooper, a reference and instruction librarian, will discuss her experiences in using these resources and the impact they've made in her library instruction.
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    • New Acquisitions Retrieval System (NARS) - a New Tool to Promote Library Collection
    • Youbo Wang, Systems/Electronic Resources Librarian
      Pratt Institute, NY

      This presentation describes the New Acquisitions Retrieval System (NARS) implemented at the University of Central Missouri (UCM) Library. Based on PHP and MYSQL, NARS provides an easy and efficient way to keep patrons updated on library new acquisitions through its different search functions and RSS feeds.

      Click to view the abstract

      This article describes the New Acquisitions Retrieval System (NARS) implemented at the University of Central Missouri (UCM) Library. To keep patrons informed on library collection update, more and more libraries have added new acquisitions lists to their Web sites. However, most of those lists are in plain html format. It is not easy for patrons to navigate especially when there is a large amount of new purchases. It is also time-consuming and labor-consuming to manually update the list. NARS provides an efficient way to present library new acquisitions to patrons. Its search function allows patrons to retrieve new acquisitions either through selecting the subject area(s) or through refining the search by title, author, call number, and acquisition date. The PHP and MYSQL based content management structure allows the system administrator to update the data easily.

      Another important feature of NARS is its Really Simple Syndication (RSS) function. NARS not only provides RSS feed(s), but also allows patrons to create their own feeds. By subscribing to RSS feed(s), patrons automatically receive the new acquisitions list(s) through RSS feed readers. In addition, NARS RSS feeds cooperate well with other web2.0 tools such as Libguides.
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    • When the Money Runs Out: What Do Technical Services Staff Do?
    • Janice Boyer, Cataloging Librarian
      University of Nebraska-Omaha, NE

      In the current economy, Library acquisition budgets are being spent months before the end of the fiscal year. What do talented technical services staff who spend most of their time ordering, cataloging, and processing materials do until new items once again are purchased? Obvious and some not so obvious suggestions will be presented.

      Click to view the abstract

      Library acquisitions budgets are frozen or spent and it is several months until the beginning of a new fiscal year. What do you do with the talented technical services staff members who spend most of their time ordering, cataloging, and processing new materials? There are obvious tasks such as clearing backlogs or doing cleanup projects that never seem to get done. However, this is an opportunity to enhance skills and explore new and better ways to improve access to library materials. Ways of creating a positive environment that encourages technical services staff to embrace the situation as an opportunity will be explored.
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    • Excel-erate Your Metadata: Tips and Tricks for Using Excel to Generate Metadata for the Non-Programmer
    • Teressa Keenan, Metadata & Digital Production Librarian
      The University of Montana, Missoula, MT

      This lightening round session will explore some functions within Microsoft Excel 2007 that can be used to simplify metadata creation. Formulas, macros, and editing features such as Fill and Replace can be used to generate metadata without the expertise of a computer programmer.

      Click to view the abstract

      The Mansfield Library continues to add digital collections to the library, using the ContentDM platform. Extensive use of Microsoft Excel has simplified metadata generation and the creation of tab-delimited text files for uploading metadata, object structure and filename information into ContentDM.

      Two individual projects prompted the investigation into using Excel to simplify metadata creation. Each had different requirements, but both benefited from learning some simple formatting tricks available in Excel.

      In the first project a number of Forest Service publications were scanned and saved as .pdf files. Most of these items already had descriptive records in the library's catalog. Rather than keying in the metadata for individual titles by hand, a report was generated which pulled the information from specific MARC tags for each of the titles and placed it in an Excel spreadsheet. Before that information could be imported into ContentDM it had to be cleaned up and crossswalked to Dublin Core. Special characters, such as delimiters, and other formatting did not transfer to the spreadsheet cleanly. Excel formulas such as CLEAN and CONCATENATE can be used to automate the process. A macro was created to then change the headers from the MARC tags to the DC elements. A few manual additions were then made and the spreadsheet was saved as a .txt file and uploaded into ContentDM.

      The second project involved scanning books and creating a structure that allowed a user to view each page in the correct order. An Excel spreadsheet was used to define the structure of the digital object and to create both object-level and item-level metadata. The MID and CONCATENATE formulas were used to extract the page number information from the file name for insertion into the title field of the item-level metadata. This greatly automated the process of providing page number information for the user. Additional Excel features such as Fill, Find/Replace, and Paste Special were used to more easily make changes to the spreadsheet formatting so it could then be saved as a .txt file and imported into ContentDM.

      All of the tips and tricks discussed in this paper are straightforward and learnable by the basic/intermediate Excel user. While other techniques may accomplish the same results, using preprogrammed features in Excel makes it possible to generate a large amount of metadata without a lot of manual effort using tools already available to most libraries and not requiring the experience of a computer programmer.
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  1. Cataloging Streaming Media: Tools and Rules
  2. Janice Boyer, Cataloging Librarian
    University of Nebraska-Omaha, NE

    You have been asked to catalog streaming media and, of course, you have indicated that it is no problem. Where do you start? What resources are available to help? What issues do you need to address? Best practices for cataloging streaming media have recently been developed and you can use those tools to make the best decisions for your institution.

    Click to view the abstract

    Streaming media is becoming a significant educational tool. Providing transparent access to streaming media for instructors and students is needed to easily locate and utilize the instructional value of the content. There are a variety of ways to provide access to streaming media including links on a dedicated web page or course management software such as Blackboard or Moodle. The Library catalog, as a discovery tool, serves as an excellent gateway to connect the user to the needed streaming media content. The catalog makes it possible to search by a variety of access points so it can be more flexible than other methods of access.

    Guidelines for determining what is and what is not streaming media will be discussed. Cataloging rules and tools as well as sources of cataloging information will be identified. MARC fields that are utilized for streaming media will be highlighted. Considerations as to whether to create a new catalog record for streaming media that also has a physical format such as DVD or compact disc or to link the streaming video to an existing record will be examined.

    Access and authentications issues will be explored with examples of how several universities have handled the authentication of purchased streaming media. The approach the University of Nebraska at Omaha has taken to cataloging and providing access to streaming video will be explained.
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  1. Using LibGuides to Enhance One Shot Instruction Sessions
  2. Rick Dyson, Information Services Librarian
    Missouri Western State University, Saint Joseph, MO

    Web2.0 is one of the new buzzwords in libraries today. Web2.0 technologies are viewed by many as a way to better grab the attention of today's students and make instruction more relevant and engaging. This program will offer demonstrate the use of the LibGuides to enhance the one shot instruction session covering two standard themes in Library Instruction: Internet site evaluation and teaching students the skills to differentiate between scholarly and popular articles. In addition, I will discuss other uses for LibGuides.

    Click to view the abstract

    With the advent of Web 2.0 technologies librarians are seeking ways to integrate these new tools into their teaching. This presentation will discuss using LibGuides to aid in the teaching of two standard library instruction lessons. With all the changes in technology and in library instruction over the course of this decade, instruction librarians are still confronted with teaching many of the same concepts they have taught for many years. However, with the advent of Web 2.0 technologies we can find new and engaging ways to teach these standard concepts. This session will specifically address two long standing issues in Library Instruction; Internet evaluation and differentiating between scholarly articles and popular articles. I will detail how to teach these two concepts using LibGuides while actively engaging students in the lesson and sharpening their critical thinking skills in a one shot instruction session. Missouri Western University Library purchased a license to LibGuides in 2007 and has used this platform to create produce guides for student and internal uses. LibGuides enables librarians to integrate video, RSS feeds, podcasts, polls, other Web2.0 technologies and interactive tools into class specific guides. Although this presentation showcases the LibGuides product there are other tools that are similar to LibGuides that can be used to recreate the methods mentioned in this program.
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  1. Moving from Meebo to Libraryh3lp: IM and Text Messaging Services at K-State Libraries

    Danielle Theiss-White, General Reference Coordinator
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

    Jason Coleman, Service Coordinator
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

    Laura Bonella, Reference Generalist
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

    Jenny McCraw Dale, Instructional Design Librarian
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

    Melia Erin Fritch, Reference Generalist
    Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

    K-State Libraries began using Meebo for our IM service in 2006 and moved to Libraryh3lp in 2008. Come learn why we switched to Libraryh3lp and the benefits of using this system. By the end of this session you will know how to implement or upgrade IM services at your library.

    Click to view the abstract

    Please join K-State Librarians as we share our success story of implementing Instant Messaging and text messaging reference services. We will begin by addressing why we began offering IM reference service (in October 2006) and added text messaging reference service (in December 2007). During this introduction we will contend that our reasons are applicable to all libraries and explain why we believe libraries that have not yet begun offering IM reference should strongly consider doing so.

    To help other libraries successfully launch or expand these services, we will then describe how easy it is to implement MeeboMe widgets and use Meebo to simultaneously monitor and respond to all questions coming through the widgets, through client-side IM applications, or through text messaging. In addition, we will stress the importance of promoting the services and describe some of the wonderfully successful efforts K-State Libraries have used to market them to undergraduates, graduates, and even faculty members! To help other libraries gain an idea of how the service can grow in popularity, we will provide usage statistics and show how frequency of use was positively impacted by implementing MeeboMe widgets on more Web sites and by actively promoting use of the service.

    Then, to help other libraries understand the potential consequences of this growth, we will share some of the challenges that we have experienced as the services have become more and more popular and as patrons have become accustomed to the convenience and speed of communicating with the library via online or text chat. We will conclude by discussing how we responded to these challenges in August of 2008 by moving from Meebo to Libraryh3lp and by increasing the number of staff we have monitoring the service during peak times. We will also help you decide whether Libraryh3lp may be a good option for your library!
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  1. Coursecasting with iTunes University

    Plamen Miltenoff, Associate Professor
    St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN

    Pamela Salela, Associate Professor
    University of Illinois, Springfield, IL

    Gary Schnellert, Educational Leadership Doctoral Coordinator
    University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

    From iPods podcasting to course-casting, audio and video delivery through subscription is proliferating on campuses. This session will briefly cover the technicality of the process and will focus on the didactical application of course casting in education. Particular examples will be drawn in applying this technology for the embedded librarian.

    Click to view the abstract

    A comparison of the use of iTunes University on three campuses doing distance education, one in Illinois, one in Minnesota and one in North Dakota. Two librarians (one from Illinois and one from Minnesota) and a faculty member from North Dakota, teach classes and workshops using iTunes University. This audio & visual software tool enables instruction to be more mobile, allowing students to download lectures to their iPods or listen (and watch, in the case of vodcasts) to course materials wherever they have an internet connection. We will compare the iTunes University services at the three institutions to delineate similarities and differences and to pinpoint advantages and disadvantages of using this podcasting service as a teaching tool for information literacy and other forms of instruction. Further discussion includes the role of the library as a technology hub in providing such services on campus.
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Sponsored by Owens Library , Northwest Missouri State University

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