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Northwest Missouri State University


Our General Education Writing Program

Because we value the role writing can play in students' learning and everyday lives, every faculty member in our department teaches general education writing classes. We are dedicated to making the experience challenging and relevant to students, and are committed to helping students become more conscientious writers and readers.

After completing English 111 and 112 or English 115, students should demonstrate:

  • Recognize that reading and writing in the university comprise a variety of academic literacies.
  • Understand and use reading to actively interact with texts and understand the value of active reading in the university.
  • Understand and use rhetorical and communicative strategies to effectively express ideas in the university.
  • Recognize the role of writing in intellectual development and use writing to increase learning.
  • Be able to generate texts that effectively use forms of academic argumentation with specific attention to audience and purpose, and elements such as thesis development, paragraphing, organization and style.
  • Have a developing conception of writing process strategies and an emerging sense of how to apply these to their own writing.
  • Comprehend the value of research and means of incorporating source materials, and
  • use source material effectively in their writing. 
  • Recognize and use reading and writing conventions of communities beyond the university.
  • Conceptualize the relationship of media and genre to rhetorical strategies.
  • Understand and use writing as a means of engaging with issues important to their communities.
  • Adapt academic argumentation and conventions to writing for a variety of contexts.
  • Use research and source material, including appropriate documentation, in a variety of media or genres.
  • Understand the benefits of using reading and writing as a means of substantial engagement with an issue.